Category Archives: photography

Like The Second Avenue Subway? Remember The 3rd Avenue “El”

Forget the Second Avenue subway—we’re obsessed with this elevated train on Third Avenue. In a new exhibit at the New York Transit Museum, there are vintage photos of the train from 1955, the year it closed. The photographer was Sid Kaplan, who was only 17 years old when he got these shots.

The aboveground railroad in Manhattan was like a High Line of the East Side and one of the four lines in Manhattan in the late 1800s. It eventually ran from the South Ferry terminal up to 113rd Street. The northern Bronx stations remained in service until 1973, but the rest of the railroad was demolished soon after its 1955 closure. Forget the Second Avenue subway—we’re obsessed with this elevated train on Third Avenue.  The photographer was Sid Kaplan, who was only 17 years old when he got these shots.

Feature image is East Village near Cooper Union

Below is 84th Street near station.

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Old Pictures From An Early AMTRAK

In posters from the era, trains were pitched to passengers as the most modern and aspirational way to travel.

amtraktaglines

With taglines in the 1970s encouraging travellers to ‘get off your wheels and on to ours’ Amtrak showcased a series of vibrant adverts depicting the freedom of the network

amtrakpresidentford

President Ford on an Amtrak train in the 1970s surrounded by supporters and the press

amtrakredcaps

Staff members known as Red Caps at Santa Fe Depot in Fort Worth, Texas, move sacks and parcels between the baggage car and depot. Red Caps helped passengers with baggage navigate through the station; here they wear a jumpsuit introduced in early 1972 and their trademark red hats. The baggage car features the Phase II paint scheme introduced in 1975.

amtrakturbotrain

A color photograph showing the TurboTrain stopped at Petersburg, Virginia, during its 1971 national tour. This type of train was primarily used between New York and Boston until its retirement in 1976

amtrakcustomerservice

Passenger service representative Patty Saunders speaks with travellers in a first-class Metroliner club car – known as Metroclub. In her role, Saunders assisted customers on the train and served them food and beverages at their seat. The first class Metroclub had roomy, individually reclining swivel parlour chairs and there was also a phone booth available to passengers

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-4084712/Fascinating-photos-1970s-reveal-Amtrak-s-early-days.html#ixzz4WmS5pDKL

The Late, Great New York Central Railroad In Pictures

We are sharing several New York Central Railroad pictures sent by Wayne Koch.

The feature image at the top is famous locomotive 999. Picture taken at the 1948 Chicago Rail Fair by Ed Nowak. From the J. David Ingles Collection.

The 999 Steam Locomotive was a new concept in speed locomotives. Engine 999 was assigned to haul the New York Central Railroad’s brilliant new passenger train, the Empire State Express. On May 10, 1893, the 999 became the fastest land vehicle when it reached a record speed of 112.5 mph. The 999 maintained the record for a decade.

Designed by William Buchanan and manufactured by the New York Central Railroad in West Albany, New York in 1893, the 999 was commissioned to haul the Empire State Express, which ran from Syracuse to Buffalo. This relatively smooth run and the 999’s cutting-edge design gave the new locomotive an opportunity to make history.

20th CENTURY LIMITED AT CHICAGO
20th CENTURY LIMITED AT CHICAGO

20th CENTURY LIMITED AT CHICAGO. Picture taken by Ed Nowak. From the J. David Ingles Collection.

The 20th Century Limited was an express passenger train on the New York Central Railroad (NYC) from 1902 to 1967, advertised as “The Most Famous Train in the World”. In the year of its last run, The New York Times said that it “…was known to railroad buffs for 65 years as the world’s greatest train”. The train traveled between Grand Central Terminal (GCT) in New York City and LaSalle Street Station in Chicago, Illinois, along the railroad’s “Water Level Route”.

1985-03
Next is Niagara 6022 at Buffalo, NY. 1949. Photo by William W. Renn

In 1945, the Equipment Engineering Department of the New York Central Railroad developed and Alco (American Locomotive Company) in Schenectady, NY executed a locomotive design which had a marked impact on the steam locomotives to follow, and on the traditional measurements by which motive power would be evaluated. This locomotive was so significant that its performance is still discussed by the men who design and run locomotives. The locomotive was the New York Central class S1 4-8-4 Niagara.

Cleveland Union Terminal eecttric locomotives
Cleveland Union Terminal electric locomotives

These huge electric locomotives originally served the Cleveland Union Terminal then were moved to Harmon, NY to handle traffic in and out of Grand Central Terminal.

What riding Amtrak was like in the 1970s

Hard to believe that stuff that happened all in many of our lives is now called HISTORIC.

Photo at top: Northbound Silver Star in 1977

Amtrak was incorporated in 1971, and spent much of that decade establishing its operations, route network, and design and branding. USA TODAY Travel asked Amtrak to search its archives for photos and materials that show what American rail travel was like in the 1970s. From the TurboTrain to the Metroclub, be prepared for a groovy trip down memory lane!

 

 

Transit Museum in NYC shares MTA history, interactive exhibits

New York’s Transit Museum is in the former Court Street station on the corner of Boerum Place and Schermerhorn Street in Downtown Brooklyn.

The station opened in 1936, but closed 10 years later because it wasn’t used enough, explained Regina Asborno, director of the museum. There were plans at the time to eventually connect the station to the Second Avenue line in Manhattan, but that never happened.

Since the museum is inside a former station, the entrance is just like any other entrance to a below-ground subway station. There is also a handicap-accessible entrance, but this is the main entrance.

In 2015, the museum had a record year with 170,000 visitors,

There was a shuttle train that operated at Court Street, but it only brought passengers to one other station about three blocks away, so it wasn’t necessary to keep. It was turned into a museum in the summer of 1976.

The first exhibit in the museum is called “Steel, Stone, and Backbone: Building New York’s Subways, 1900-1925.” It takes visitors through the stages of building the subways. Asborno said many of the pictures they have of the construction were taken for insurance purposes at the time. Since the construction was quite dangerous and could potentially affect the buildings above ground, photographers were hired to take pictures along the routes of the first tunnels, she explained.

On the original platform and tracks of the station, the museum features vintage trains that were used starting in 1904. The train doors are open so people can go inside.

Asborno said there are also vintage buses, but they are too large to be shown at the museum. They are kept in various MTA bus depots and brought out for special occasions, such as the annual Bus Festival in September.

Take a step back to 1904 by walking through the oldest trains at the museum. The trains were used on the elevated tracks at the time, Asborno said. They are made of wood, which makes them lighter and more functional on elevated tracks but not practical for underground tracks.

These trains only had doors at either end of the cars, and at each stop, the gates had to be manually opened by an operator on each car. The operators communicated with the conductor using bells on each car to let him know he could start the train again.

The term straphangers, used to describe commuters, comes from the straps that hung from the top of these original cars.

SubwayAdvertisementsOLD

Advertisements have always been a part of the subway system. While the ads on each of the cars are replicas of originals, they give visitors an idea of the time period. Asborno said trains have a 40- to 60-year life span, so the ads would have changed many times in each of the cars.

A 10-car trial train was built in 1949 in anticipation of the Second Avenue subway line. Each car cost $100,000 to build, which is how it got its name, The Million Dollar Train. At the time, “The New York Times” deemed it the “car of tomorrow” because of its modern look, including new fluorescent lighting. But the train was never in full operation, as the Second Avenue line has yet to be built, and the cars were redesigned to operate with existing trains.

The newest car in the exhibit is just like many that run today. Asborno said this car is a favorite for kids because they usually aren’t allowed to explore the cars when they ride the subway. It’s also used for programs to help people with social or intellectual disabilities learn social skills to help them ride the subways, Asborno said.

SubwayturnstileRemember when the subway fare was only 15 cents? Neither do we, but you can see what the turnstiles looked like when it was that cheap. The earliest turnstile from 1904 didn’t even have a spot for coins, tokens or cards. Commuters would buy their tickets, hand them to an operator and the operator would allow them through the turnstile by pressing a pedal.

The “Bringing Back the City: Mass Transit Responds to Crisis” exhibit gives visitors a behind-the-scenes look at how the MTA operates. There are first-hand experiences from MTA employees about the attacks on 9/11, the 2003 Northeast Blackout, the Blizzard of 2010, Hurricane Irene and superstorm Sandy. Asborno said people often don’t realize how many different jobs there are in the MTA, which employs over 60,000 people.

The Transit Museum is open Tuesday through Sunday. Admission is $7 for adults and $5 for children and senior citizens.

By Nicole Brown

BNSF Railway and FAA are testing drones for bridge and air quality inspections

Drones aren’t just good for taking arial pictures of your neighborhood or accidentally crashing into trees. They can be used to inspect rural railroad bridges as well as monitor air quality, too.

Edward R. Hamberger, President and CEO of the Association of American Railroads, said Wednesday morning during a State of the Industry call that BNSF Railway, the country’s second largest railroad, is working with the Federal Aviation Administration on drone pilot program.

The program called the “Pathfinder Program” uses drones to remotely inspect track, bridge and other freight rail infrastructures as well as monitor the quality of air in and around railroad lines.

The program is for more than modernizing a transportation industry that to many in the public looks virtually archaic. Drones can provide meaningful support in the safety of railroads.

“Soon, a drone flying at 500 feet may be able to spot a quarter-inch separation in a rail line even at night and in poor weather conditions.” read the railroad 2016 State of the Industry report.

BNSF is one of three American companies, including CNN and PrecisionHawk, working with the FAA in public-private partnership to research safe drone operation.

Though Hamberger admitted the use of drones is very promising for the rail industry, there are many questions that need to be answered before drones become a regular part of the railroad safety infrastructure.

“Does it in fact allow over the line of sight inspection of bridges? How will that work?” Hamberger rhetorically asked during the call.

While questions still need to be answered, it’s clear drones will likely play a role in the future of rail. After all, they can safely inspect parts of the freight rail lines where temperatures can drop well below zero during the dead of winter.

The World Of Videos

I usually do not watch videos because I “read speed” and can cover more stuff with words. But someone sent me a link for a video

“A great RR film from the early 1950s w/ a good amount on the Hudson Division.”
I watched it then looked at “upcoming” on the right hand side.  They had others that a NY Central fan could not ignore like the Century, the Empire, etc.
Then I spot the New Haven Railroad. Then I spotted one I would never miss: The Troy Union Railroad!
Great way to spend an evening!
 

MTA Busts Out This Beautiful Old 1930s Subway Train

The MTA dusted off one of its vintage 1930s-era subway trains and put it back in service on Sunday, as part of its annual holiday nostalgia train service. The old R1/9 train operated on the M line between Queens Plaza and 2nd Avenue, giving commuters a taste of what mass transit was like back when Jimmy Walker was mayor. Check out the video:

If you want to take a spin on this old beauty, you’ll have more chances on the remaining Sundays in December. Here are some more details about the old train from the MTA:

For four consecutive Sundays in December, subway customers can catch the “Shoppers Special,” a train consisting of eight cars from the 1930s that ran along the lettered lines until the late 1970s. The cars, which were ordered for the Independent Subway System (IND), were the first subway cars to be identified by their contract numbers, hence the R1/9 designations.R1/9 cars, known as “City-Cars,” have rattan seats, ceiling fans, incandescent light bulbs, and roll signs for passenger information. Their design of more doors that were also wider and faster, plus increased standing capacity to accommodate crowds, served as the model of modern subway cars, and their dimensions are identical to the latest R160 cars. They were retired from service in 1977.

“For all intents and purposes, this was the first modern subway car and today’s subway fleets owe a lot to the design,” Joe Leader, Senior Vice President of Subways, said in a statement. “They were basic, durable and offered the expected levels of customer comfort for decades after they were introduced into service. We continue to build upon this strong foundation with each new car design.”

Eternal

Perspectives on Life, the Universe and Everything

Dear one
full of fear one
why worry
future would come
we would be same
passion may tame
But love…yes, love
would keep us warm
hand and hand
weather any storm
that daily kiss
you emboss on my lips
would last me for years
my face reflects
joyful tears
your embrace holds
million fables,
stories you told
more than enough
for my old age
my beautiful
vivacious sage
come, lie beside me
under open skies
I feel free
even stars agree
on a moonless night
your hand on my heart
what a wonderful sight
I will never lose
my drive, my thirst
of you and that smile
just one last wish
I don’t do goodbyes
please let me die first20140603-064244 am-24164870.jpg

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Revolution – rock n roll

Perspectives on Life, the Universe and Everything

Shut the gate, shut the gate
Right in the face of the enemy you hate
Shut the gate, shut the gate,
Shut, shut, shut, shut
Shut the gate
Iron minds, long marches,
Picket arches, barricades
Shut the gate, shut the gate
Shut, shut, shut, shut
Shut the gate
Power brokers, men with guns,
Electrocuted, maimed, stunned,
it is invariably just too late
Shut the gate, shut the gate
Shut, shut, shut, shut
Shut the gate
Fire at will, how many to kill
they will keep…coming still,
Diabolical, abominable nanny state
Shut the gate, shut the gate,
Shut, shut, shut, shut
Shut the gate
Right in the face of the enemy you hate
Just keep going, never ever stop
Thick headed forces, penny will drop
Shut the gate, shut the gate,
Shut, shut, shut, shut
Shut the gate
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