Category Archives: New York City

Andrew Cuomo Is Hiding from NYC’s Subway Nightmare

From Vice.com

The real reason the country’s largest subway became such a total disaster.

What do you do when your political brand is based on old-school competence, but you literally can’t keep the trains running on time? For New York governor Andrew Cuomo, presiding over a subway system that’s become a total nightmare, the answer seems to be: Hope your constituents think it’s someone else’s fault.

Cuomo’s public image has never been about an inspiring message or firing up a passionate base. He lost more than a third of the vote as an incumbent in a Democratic primary in 2014 after pushing deep cuts to school aid, declaring war on unions, and tacitly supporting a Republican takeover of his state senate. Nor is he one of those happy retail politicians who derives popularity from attending local events, shaking hands, and flashing a friendly smile.

Instead, a key selling point for Cuomo has been a promise of barebones effectiveness. Or, as the man himself explained in a 2015 New Yorker profile: “Show me, it’s show-me time. Show me results. Build a bridge, build a train to LaGuardia, clear the snow, save lives. Huh? A little competence.”

It’s precisely this “a little competence, huh?” shtick that makes the disastrous state of New York City’s subways so dangerous to Cuomo—and why it’s vital for him that city residents continue to not realize that it is he, Cuomo (and not his nemesis, Mayor Bill de Blasio), who controls this mess.

How bad is the subway situation, exactly? A woman recently got her head stuck in a train, and people just kept walking past her. These people resorted to taking their shirts and pants off after being stuck in an underground tunnel for 45 minutes. This guy missed his graduation and had to settle for some passengers giving him a makeshift subterranean ceremony because his train was delayed for almost three hours. Signal malfunctions, crowding, and track repair delays have become commonplace, and there are now 70,000 delays a month—nearly triple the number five years ago. The results, beyond people losing their minds, include lost wages from tardiness and missed medical appointments.

And all of that’s before the pending shutdown of the L train upends thousands of people’s lives.

Seizing on those who understandably assume this stuff is the province of the local mayor, Cuomo recently proposed an adorable bill giving himself control of the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) that he already oversees. “Who’s in charge [of the trains]?” he asked last week. “Who knows! Maybe the county executive, maybe the president, maybe the governor, maybe the mayor.”

It’s super weird that Cuomo isn’t sure who controls the transit system, since this winter he orchestrated a multimedia self-promotional tour to take credit for opening the “Second Avenue subway.” This included a fawning profile in the Times in which he invoked Robert Moses, and a celebration in which the MTA’s Tom Prendergast gushed about how proud he was to serve the governor. Never mind that the project was over budget, overdue, and basically amounted to the addition of three subway stops. For this particular development, Cuomo was not confused as to who controlled the subways. (He was right then: The governor not only appoints the head of the MTA, but also a plurality of its board. The MTA is chartered by the state, and even the agency’s own website says the governor appoints the members.)

Cuomo’s real coup has been dodging a full-fledged media scandal over this stuff, due partially to a quirk of geography.

Some excellent journalists are out there covering Cuomo’s administration, holding his feet to the fire on everything from his double talk on political corruption to a water poisoning crisis in upstate Hoosick Falls. The vast majority reside and work in Albany—which is great when a major event or story occurs in the State Capitol or nearby. In those cases, reporters are able to experience it directly and viscerally (and then go a short distance and report on it). Many times, the big stories requiring context and reporting involve the legislative process, and the Albany press corps are experts at condensing this super boring but important minutia.

The problem is when a Cuomo story happens hours away from the people keeping tabs on him. In the case of the ongoing subway nightmare, the reporters experiencing (and covering) these hellish commutes, the ones who know precisely how the MTA works on a day-to-day basis, are not necessarily in position to put pressure on Cuomo in Albany.

While the governor has received his share of unpleasant criticism over this fiasco, he still seems to be evading a total bulldozing in the press. Which means many people still don’t know where to point their fingers.

Speaking of Albany reporters covering the legislative process, some dogged ones noticed earlier this month that Cuomo tried to slip in a provision in the dark of night that would replace the honorary name of the Tappan Zee bridge from that of one former governor, Malcolm Wilson, to that of another: Cuomo’s father, Mario.

Ultimately the provision was stalled (though perhaps just temporarily), when members of the state assembly declined to vote on it.

While the effort by Cuomo was roundly criticized, with one sharp observer calling it an “incredibly classic Cuomo/Albany story” and a “ridiculous farce,” perhaps it could still spawn an idea that actually serves the public. If the governor is so keen on blessing major infrastructure with his family name, Albany leaders might just oblige—by naming the current transportation mess after its rightful owner.

The Andrew Cuomo Subway System has a nice ring to it.

Work at Penn Station N.Y. to impact Amtrak’s Keystone service

PennLive via California Rail News

Frequent rail travelers to New York take note: Amtrak service from Philadelphia to New York is about to change slightly this summer.
As part of infrastructure upgrades to New York’s Penn Station, Amtrak has announced a short list of service changes that may impact travel from Harrisburg to Philadelphia to New York.

Acela Express service will run as scheduled.

Trips that do not make as much money like some Harrisburg trains are killed.

Going South, there are no alternatives to switch too like Grand Central.

The state of the New York subway: transit experts weigh in

From CURBED NY

Every day, it seems as though there’s another instance in which the New York City subway fails massively—and, impossibly, the aftermath of those problems also seems to be getting worse. Perhaps you heard about the ride in which a train was stalled for so long that a guy hopped out of the train and walked the tracks to the next station? (Don’t do that, by the way.) Or the one in which commuters were stuck on a train, sans electricity or air conditioning, for over an hour?

Granted, subway breakdowns also seem to be getting more attention thanks to the rise of social media. There are more ways than ever to document when problems happen, and more voices that are ready and willing to broadcast them, which leads to the question: Is subway service actually getting worse, or are more people paying attention now?

Bad news: It’s the former. “I do think [the subway is] measurably worse than [it was] a couple of years ago,” says Ben Kabak, the blogger behind Second Ave. Sagas, though he acknowledges the role that social media is playing in hyping the problems.

“[Social media] is helping make our elected officials pay attention,” says John Raskin, the head of transit advocacy group the Riders Alliance. “[But] it’s not just people’s day-to-day commutes. Subway service has deteriorated noticeably over the last five years.”

The numbers back that up: the MTA periodically releases data tracking its performance, and the numbers are not good. In February, it was revealed that monthly delays had increased to about 70,000—a figure that’s increased dramatically since 2012, when the agency reported about 28,000 delays per month. The Straphangers Campaign, which releases an annual report card for the subway system, has also tracked worsening service vis-à-vis previous years; according to its latest report, car breakdowns have increased, while subway regularity has decreased overall.

According to Raskin, there are three factors that have contributed to the decline in subway service: equipment failures, like recent power outages and signal problems; overcrowding; and a one-two punch of massive delays and unreliable service, which can largely be attributed to the first two issues.

The MTA has, at least, acknowledged the severity of these problems: the agency recently ordered a review of the increase in subway delays, in addition to its six-point plan to tackle that issue. But one of the biggest issues—the MTA’s aging signals, some of which date back to when the transit system was created more than a century ago—is also proving to be one of the hardest to fix.

The MTA has committed $2.1 billion from its current capital plan to repair its signals, but as a recent report from the city’s Independent Budget Office notes, many of the scheduled fixes are happening behind schedule, if they’ve been started at all. Per the report, the current capital plan has 14 signal-related projects scheduled to begin by the end of 2017—more than half of which are now delayed. “They don’t have a plan yet to speed up the replacement of signals sooner than the next few decades,” notes Kabak, “and there’s a groundswell of voices calling on them to improve service sooner than they can.”

And according to Raskin, “the problem is not that the MTA doesn’t know how to run trains. The problem is that every governor in a generation has underinvested in public transit.” That includes Governor Andrew Cuomo, who Raskin says has “ignored deteriorating transit service” in favor of funding big-ticket projects like the first segment of the Second Avenue Subway.

Raskin and the Riders Alliance—along with a growing chorus of voices, both on and off Twitter—have been particularly pointed in their criticism of Cuomo, who was initially less than vocal about this year’s uptick in service disruptions, and has occasionally claimed that he’s not in charge of the subway. (He is, for the record.) In recent weeks, Cuomo has put forth more of an effort into addressing the subway’s meltdown, and recently asked former MTA chairman Joe Lhota to step back into that role, noting his “proven track record needed to address the enormous challenges facing the nation’s largest mass transportation system.”

Kabak is optimistic about the choice. “The MTA needs a crisis manager,” he explains. “Lhota knows what the agency is capable of. He knows the challenges it’s facing.” And as Kabak notes with a laugh, “he actually rides the subway”—something both Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio have been criticized for not doing regularly.

Raskin is also cautiously optimistic, but notes that “no chairman or CEO can substitute for leadership from the governor.” He continues, “the change we need is not going to come unless riders demand it until we get what we need from the governor and state lawmakers.”

He proposes that riders keep doing what they’re doing: make their voices heard when issues arise. “Take advantage of newfound Wi-Fi service,” Raskin says. “Tweet and email Governor Cuomo to make sure he understands that riders won’t go away.” That shouldn’t be too much of a problem.

Governor Cuomo Bringing In HIS Team To Run MTA

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and Metropolitan Transportation Authority Interim Executive Director Ronnie Hakim today announced that Janno Lieber, a senior private sector real estate development and construction executive who is the current President of World Trade Center Properties, will join the senior executive ranks of the MTA as Chief Development Officer. In this newly created position, Lieber will take over leadership and oversight of key strategic capital initiatives focused on increasing the capacity of the system.

“The key to transforming the MTA is delivering on bold and ambitious projects that will give New Yorkers the enhanced, modern transportation system they deserve,” Governor Cuomo said. “Janno Lieber has a proven track record of innovative success managing multi-billion dollar projects in the private sector and deep experience in transportation. His unique skillset is a significant asset and will help us continue to deliver on the promise of a world-class transit system for New Yorkers.”

As part of his new responsibilities, Lieber will head up the MTA Capital Construction Company and will manage the MTA’s major capital projects that expand capacity:

Second Avenue Subway Phase II – extending the line to 125th Street;
East Side Access – connecting Long Island Railroad to Grand Central Terminal;
Penn Station Access – bringing Metro-North Railroad into Penn Station;
Enhanced Stations;
Improved Rail Mass Transit Access to JFK Airport with a focus on developing a one-seat ride;
LIRR Third Track – expanding capacity on the Railroad’s main line; and
LIRR Double Track – improving service and reliability on the LIRR’s Ronkonkoma Branch.

His new broad strategic portfolio will also include oversight of the following key initiatives:
Signalization priorities – Communication Based Train Control and Positive Train Control;
MTA Real Estate – Real Estate Development; and
Alternate Project Delivery – including in particular expanded use of Public Private Partnerships.

Lieber brings extraordinary private sector experience to his new role as Chief Development Officer. Most recently, he served as President of World Trade Center Properties for 14 years where he managed the multi-billion dollar development of Silverstein Properties’ projects at the World Trade Center. Lieber’s responsibilities included managing design and building, business, finance, public affairs, legal, government and community relations. His appointment is a part of Governor Cuomo’s commitment to bringing private sector talent into public service to produce results for New Yorkers.
MTA Interim Executive Director Ronnie Hakim said, “These projects are the foundation upon which the future of our agency is being built. We look forward to Janno bringing to the MTA his lifetime of experience in getting big things accomplished – and we know that will pay lasting dividends for our riders and customers.”
Acting Chairman MTA Board Fernando Ferrer said, “The MTA is the economic engine of New York and we are moving our region forward with an unprecedented investment in our infrastructure. Janno Lieber’s has proven that he has the ability to get results and we are proud to have him on our team at the MTA.”
Janno Lieber said, “New York has always led the way in public transportation. Now, under Gov. Cuomo’s leadership we are again taking on the big projects that will make a real difference to New Yorkers’ lives and to our economic future. I’m thrilled to join him and the entire MTA team on that mission.”
Prior to World Trade Center Properties, Lieber served as Senior Vice President of Lawrence Ruben Company, and worked with clients such as Chicago Transit Authority, New Jersey Transit, and Penn Station Redevelopment Corp. – the agency responsible for planning the transformation of the James A. Farley Post Office Building into Moynihan Station.
Before that, Lieber served in the federal government, having been appointed in 1994 by President Bill Clinton to serve as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy for the U.S. Department of Transportation. In this role, Lieber spearheaded the development and roll-out of the Clinton Administration’s ISTEA authorization proposal, a highway and mass transit funding bill that included federal spending to improve, widen and extend the nation’s highway system.

Earlier in his career, Lieber practiced law at the New York firm of Patterson, Belknap Webb & Tyler and served as a transportation policy advisor in the office of New York City Mayor Ed Koch.

Lieber is a graduate of Harvard University and New York University Law Schoo

6 Amtrak trains to use Grand Central Terminal this summer

From The Journal News | LoHud.com-Jun 12, 2017

Metropolitan Transportation Authority Interim Executive Director Veronique Hakim confirmed Monday that Amtrak and the MTA have “an agreement” to begin running trains to and from upstate into the east side station, as the national railroad begins much-needed repairs in Penn Station.

“They will be bringing a small part of their Empire Service into Grand Central. We think they’re looking at six trains, three in or three out,” Hakim said. “That could provide some relief at Penn (Station) as well.”

Empire Service trains make stops between the Albany area and New York City, including Yonkers and Schenectady, among others. Some trains originate or terminate in Buffalo, making stops in Rochester and Syracuse.

Empire Service trains have not run into Grand Central since 1991 when Amtrak consolidated all its operations in Penn Station, which it owns, a move that allowed upstate travelers to change trains across a platform rather than across town.

But a litany of issues in recent months, including two derailments in the spring, has brought to light significant issues at the station, including years’ worth of neglect by Amtrak at the station.

In order to get things back into good condition, Amtrak will have to perform eight weeks of improvements starting next month, which will take tracks out of service and wreak havoc on Long Island Railroad and NJ Transit schedules.

Hakim said the MTA would be monitoring the improvement process closely to make sure Amtrak is finished on time.

“We want to keep Amtrak’s feet to the fire when it comes to meeting their schedule,” she said.

Hakim announced changes to the Long Island Railroad, including lengthening trains, canceling others, running buses and ferries free for weekly and monthly ticket holders and slashing overnight tolls for trucks.

“We know that our customers have had enough. We heard them loud and clear,” Hakim said. “Dozens of weekly delays … have rippling consequences, not just here but throughout our entire region.”

NJ Transit, which operates trains to and from Rockland County, had announced its plans earlier. They include routing some lines into Hoboken and adjusting schedules for others.

Rockland County trains will work on their regular schedules, according to the NJ Transit plan, though commuters who change at Secaucus Junction for Penn Station may need to adjust their schedules, the agency said.

Signal Problems Lead to Hours of Subway Disruptions — Again

It was the fourth time in a few weeks that signal problems caused hours-long service disruptions

NBC New York By Andrew Siff

Signal problems mucked up subway travel on the A and C lines from Brooklyn to Manhattan for more than four hours Thursday, the fourth time in just a few weeks that such issues have snarled service.

The MTA said the problems at High Street had been cleared by about 2:15 p.m. (an initial advisory about the service changes came shortly before 10 a.m.) and A and C service had resumed with delays.

In the meantime, on AM New York
Loose stairway treads. Cracked platforms. Water leaks.
As if subway riders didn’t have enough to deal with in terms of the decline in subway service, the MTA is failing to spot and repair crumbling station infrastructure and jeopardizing riders’ safety in the process, according to a new audit released Thursday.

Stewart Air Base A Fourth NY City Airport?

Stewart International Airport is in the southern Hudson Valley, west of Newburgh, New York, approximately 60 miles (97 km) north of Manhattan, New York City. The airport is in the Town of Newburgh and the Town of New Windsor.

Developed in the 1930s as a military base to allow cadets at the nearby United States Military Academy at West Point to learn aviation (at the direction of General Douglas MacArthur), it has grown into the major passenger airport for the mid-Hudson region and continues as a military airfield.

Over the years it has had a checkered history of “ownership”: NY State, Port Authority, private, etc. Also all kinds of “do-gooders” who opposed it’s use.

Biggest problem is a convenient New York City connection.

Metro-North’s Port Jervis line offers a direct connection to Hoboken, New Jersey,from the Salisbury Mills Station. (pictured here) Salisbury Mills is about three miles from Stewart. Taxi service is available. NO BUS! Check out more on Salisbury Mills from “I Ride The Harlem Line”: http://www.iridetheharlemline.com/tag/salisbury-mills/

Metro-North’s Hudson line provides a direct link to Grand Central Station in New York City from the Beacon Station. (pictured here)

Leprechaun Bus Lines provides frequent and inexpensive connections from the Beacon Station to Stewart. Taxi service is also available.

Find out more about Beacon Station: https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/the-final-phase-of-the-nyc-rebuilding-at-fishkill-landing/

History: Robert Young Takes Over The New York Central

Going back to follow my practice of commenting on Mark Tomlonson’s “DAY In NY Central History”

One item stood out in my mind:
“June 14, 1954 Robert R. Young officially gains control of the New York Central. Harold S. Vanderbilt is forced out, the last Vanderbilt to serve the New York Central.”

My boss (who was around in 1954) commented that June 14 was too late for the ANNUAL MEETING. “ALPHABET IT”

Well! I found a great source of information:

A GENERAL CHRONOLOGY OF THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD COMPANY ITS PREDECESSORS AND SUCCESSORS ANDITS HISTORICAL CONTEXT
By Christopher T. Baer
1954
April 2015 Edition
All data subject to correction and change
http://www.prrths.com/newprr_files/Hagley/PRR1954.pdf

Thank you Mr. Baer!!! As well as Pennsylvania RR, he covers much other railroad-related material.

1954 was BUSY with the “takeover”. Sale of NY Central Stock, etc, etc.
Al Perlman “not knowing” Mr. Young, etc.

Then I found it!

May 26, 1954
NYC holds annual meeting at Washington Avenue Armory in Albany after
Court of Appeals refuses to block Alleghany Corporation from voting its
800,000 Murchison shares at the last minute; 2,200 attend, most traveling on two special trains from Grand Central Terminal; both Robert R. Young and Pres. William White work the crowds on the trains hoping to influence votes at the last minute.

My boss thanked me but added, there was a third train to Albany from the West (Cleveland?)

Now I could not resist to find more cool stories from 1954:

Jan. 3, 1954 Last run of a Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad steam locomotive, 4-8-4 No. 622 Carter Braxton, out of Washington Union Station on a holiday mail or passenger extra.

Jan. 4, 1954 New Haven asks ICC for 33% increase in interstate and New York commuter fares.

Jan. 15, 1954 Robert R. Young calls on Harold S. Vanderbilt at Palm Beach and tells him that he and Allan P. Kirby are “getting out of C&O” and buying heavily into NYC.

Jan. 16, 1954 Robert R. Young informs Harold S. Vanderbilt (1884-1970) that he has bought into NYC and implies he will run for Chairman.

Jan. 19, 1954 Alleghany Corporation sells its entire holding of 104,854 shares of Chesapeake & Ohio Railway stock to Cleveland financier Cyrus Stephen Eaton (1883-1979), who becomes Chairman in place of Robert R. Young; Young and other Alleghany Corporation directors announce they have
resigned as directors of C&O.

Jan. 20, 1954 Robert R. Young and Allan P. Kirby of Alleghany Corporation announce they have become “substantial” stockholders of NYC.

Jan. 20, 1954 Lehigh Valley Railroad resumes dividend payments for the first time since 1932.

Jan. 21, 1954 NYC Pres. William White announces his plan for developing piggyback service with Rail-Trailer Company of Chicago.

Feb. 2, 1954 Robert R. Young meets with NYC Pres. William White and VP-Finance Willard F. Place at the Cloud Club in the Chrysler Building; offers to retain both if he wins control, providing that he is made Chairman and CEO; White is non-committal.

Feb. 4, 1954 Federal Judge Harold R. Medina (1888- ) files his ruling in U.S. v. Henry S. Morgan, et al., dismissing the Justice Department’s antitrust case against 17 investment banking firms for lack of evidence; the evidence shows no case of combination or conspiracy, and in fact shows active competition among all investment bankers; Medina dismisses the case “with prejudice,” preventing the government from retrying the case short of bringing a whole new set of charges; Robert R. Young continues to charge that Medina is biased in favor of the banks.

Feb. 9, 1954 Robert R. Young and Allan P. Kirby publicly ask for seats on the NYC Board and for Young to be elected to the vacant post of Chairman.

Feb. 10, 1954 NYC Board turns down Young’s request for seats; Young announces a proxy fight for the next annual meeting; denounces Morgan control of NYC.

Feb. 15, 1954 Robert R. Young arrives at Penn Station from Palm Beach and before a group of reporters launches his campaign to capture the NYC.

Feb. 16, 1954 Robert R. Young places ads in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal asking for nominations to serve on his projected NYC “Ownership Board of Directors”; the NYC counters by hiring the best advertising agencies and proxy solicitors, as well as deploying its own legal staff; Young relies on Thomas J. Deegan, who resigns as the Chesapeake & Ohio’s VP of Public Relations & Advertising to manage the campaign, and the law firm of Lord, Day & Lord

Feb. 18, 1954 SEC holds hearings on its proposed relaxation of Rule U-50 covering competitive bidding for securities issues; the move is supported by the major Wall Street investment banks and opposed by Robert R. Young, Otis & Co. (Cyrus S. Eaton’s firm), Halsey, Stuart & Co. and the CIO; the SEC eventually backs down and declines to adopt the proposed amendment on
July 2, 1956.

Feb. 19, 1954 Young announces he will appoint a woman to NYC Board.

Feb. 23, 1954 Chesapeake & Ohio Railway sells its 800,000 shares of NYC which are held in a voting trust by Chase National Bank, and thus could be voted by them against Robert R. Young, to Clint W. Murchison (1895-1969) of Dallas and Sid W. Richardson (1891-1959) of Fort Worth, two very wealthy Texas oilman friends of Young’s, for $20 million; Alleghany Corporation loans the Texans $7.5 million of purchase price, money which it has to borrow; Kirby loans $5 million; Cleveland banks loan another $7.5 million under a contractthat protects the Texans against loss; Alleghany Corporation receives a “put” option to purchase at least 400,000 shares at $25 between July 15 and Sep.15, the same price paid by the Texans.

Feb. 24, 1954 NYC Pres. William White issues the first public notice of the Chesapeake & Ohio’s sale of its NYC stock and tries to show that Robert R. Young still controls the policy of the C&O.

Feb. 25, 1954 Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Board approves the sale of its NYC stock to Clint W. Murchison and Sid W. Richardson.

Mar. 2, 1954 Robert R. Young announces his slate of directors for the NYC election.

Mar. 3, 1954 NYC asks ICC to investigate Young’s tactics, particularly the Murchison sale and whether Young still controls the C&O through Cyrus S. Eaton.

Mar. 3, 1954 Alleghany Corporation and Robert R. Young place full page ads in the New York Times and other papers reminding how they had forced competitive bidding for railroad securities and broke the monopoly of J.P. Morgan and Kuhn, Loeb & Co.

Mar. 4, 1954 Young sues to block NYC directors from spending company money to oppose his election.

Mar. 18, 1954 Sen. William Langer (1886-1959), Republican of North Dakota and,Chairman of the Judiciary Committee, writes to ICC in support of Robert R. Young’s bid to capture NYC and asks for investigation of interlocking relationships between PRR, NYC and B&O and (shades of 1913) J.P. Morgan & Co., the First National Bank of New York, the Chase National Bank and the Mellon National Bank.

Mar. 21, 1954 Robert R. Young announces he will appoint Mrs. Lila Bell Acheson Wallace, co-owner with her husband of Reader’s Digest and the NYC’s first woman,director; other nominees are William H. Landers, a retired NYC engineer; Young chooses persons who will appeal to all ethnic and occupational groups among the many small NYC stockholders.

Mar. 29, 1954 At a luncheon conference, Robert R. Young speaks favorably of Alfred E. Perlman (1902-1983), who has rehabilitated the Denver & Rio Grande Western, as the type of progressive railroad he would like as the NYC Pres.; he is misquoted as saying he intends to make Perlman Pres.

Mar. 30, 1954 Alfred E. Perlman denies having an offer from Young or even knowing him.

Mar. 31, 1954 Last run of passenger service on NYC’s Catskill Mountain Branch between Oneonta and Kingston, N.Y., once served by through cars from Philadelphia over the PRR and West Shore Railroad.

Apr. 6, 1954 ICC refuses the NYC’s petition to investigate the C&O’s sale of NYC shares, to Murchison and Richardson.

Apr. 7, 1954 Sadie Zenn, who owns 500 shares of Alleghany Corporation, sues the management and Murchison and Richardson on the grounds that the sale was detrimental to Alleghany’s interest and calling for Murchison and Richardson to repay the loans in cash.

Apr. 1954 May issue of Fortune carries an anti-Young editorial, “The Sound and Fury of Robert R. Young”; NYC directors distribute copies in violation of copyright law, feeling that publicity is worth the fine.

May 4, 1954 Time Inc. sues NYC, charging it reprinted the Fortune editorial against Robert R. Young without its consent

May 18, 1954 N.Y. Appellate Court orders Chase National Bank issue a proxy to Murchison and Richardson for the NYC shares purchased from the C&O.

May 19, 1954 ICC refuses the plea of NYC and Harold S. Vanderbilt to order Robert R. Young to file a takeover application with it.

May 25, 1954 Robert R. Young first meets with Alfred E. Perlman, his candidate for chief operating officer; Perlman is currently vice president of Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad, which he had rehabilitated.

ENOUGH FOR NOW
See https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/robert-r-young/

Transportation Takes Big Hit In Trump Plan

From Queens Chronical

Maloney says budget is full of baloney, as do Sens. Schumer and Gillibrand

Initiatives such as the next phase of the Second Avenue subway or the implementation of Select Bus Service on Woodhaven and Cross Bay boulevards are at risk of losing millions of dollars under President Trump’s fiscal year 2018 budget, sparking outrage from lawmakers and transportation advocates.

“The President’s budget cuts would only further delay long overdue repairs to make our transit systems more safe and reliable,” U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) said in a May 25 statement. “I will do everything I can to fight these harmful cuts and protect the funding that helps support our transit systems.”

The U.S. Department of Transportation faces a 13 percent cut overall, according to the plan, a $2.4 billion reduction from the $16.4 billion approved for the agency in the continuing resolution authorized by Congress in early May — which funds federal agencies through the end of September.

In New York State, no transit proposal is at the full-funding grant agreement stage, according to the Federal Transit Administration’s website.

That means the Gateway tunnel project, which would allow Amtrak to run trains under the Hudson River, SBS in South Queens — which, among other changes, would put dedicated bus lanes along much of Woodhaven Boulevard and have commuters wait on median bus stops — and the second phase of the Second Avenue Subway may have to be funded by other means, should Trump’s budget plan be passed by Congress the way it’s proposed.

Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn) said in a statement to the Chronicle she’ll fight to restore the transportation cuts.
“New Yorkers can’t afford cuts to federal transit investments,” said Maloney, who represents the area of Manhattan where the Second Avenue subway line is. “Rather than cut programs like TIGER and New Starts grants, we need to continue to increase investment in infrastructure so we can extend the Second Avenue Subway line north to 125th Street and south to Houston Street, and so we can also deal with the major problems plaguing Penn Station. Given these needs in New York City and similar ones around the country, I am hopeful that Congress will reject these cuts.”
U.S. Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) called Trump’s cuts to transportation “a job-killing, 180-degree turn away from his repeated promise of a trillion dollar infrastructure plan.

“President Trump’s campaign promises on infrastructure are crumbling faster than our roads, railways and bridges,” the Senate minority leader added.

Raskin and Richards also called out the president for cutting transit funding while saying he’ll improve infrastructure across the country.
“It’s both hypocritical and counter-productive if we’re trying to restore infrastructure,” Raskin said.

“So far we have not seen any signs that he’s really serious about infrastructure, outside of saying localities should take care of things,” the councilman said.

Thoughts on Commuter Parking

I was just reviewing and updating our WebSite and ran into a great article on commuting. It is included in this WebSite Connecticut To Philadelphia

Nobody can park or drive in New York City so we invented commuter railroads. Now it is getting harder and harder to park at commuter railroad stations!

Before we can get cars off the roads by persuading drivers to become passengers on the trains, we first have to give them a place to park their cars at the train stations. As all commuters know, station parking is a nightmare.

Many stations have a four- or five-year wait for annual permits, which can cost up to $600, and day-parking is expensive, if you can find it. In Connecticut, parking at most rail stations is owned by the Connecticut Department of Transportation but administered by the local towns. That is why we have ended up with different rules and pricing.

Take Rowayton for example. Every year annual permits are handed out on a first-come, first served basis one hectic Saturday morning in May. Nobody is “grandfathered-in”. Everyone literally waits in line, often all night, every year.

This may seem fair, especially to newcomers, but it’s hardly an efficient way to manage a scarce resource.

Another idea “an auction”. Spaces would start selling online on a certain date and time with the first permit going to the highest bidder in a 24-hour period. The second permit would go to the next highest bidder, etc. There’d be no preference to those who already have permits nor by town of residency. The scarce supply of spaces would moderate the demand by price.

As it is, most towns oversell their available spaces. In Westport they sell twice as many permits as there are spaces. Why? Because the permits are too cheap and there’s never a time when everybody who has one tries to park on the same day.

People hoard their annual permits, renewing them even if they don’t use them regularly. Many have waited years to get it, and are not likely to give it up, even though they use it only one or two days a week.

Is that fair to the daily commuter who needs that space but hasn’t risen to the top of the waiting list because others won’t let go? Probably not. But unless each town raises parking permit prices and squeezes greed out of the equation, they will keep hanging onto their permit. An auction would change that.

We should let the marketplace define the price of affordability, and that’s what an auction would do most efficiently.

Of course, the other solution is to add more parking spaces. When CDOT tried adding a few spaces in Rowayton a few years back, they were pilloried. When they came to Darien and proposed more parking at Noroton Heights, they were booed out of town.

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