Category Archives: History

Troy & Greenbush Railroad

The Troy and Greenbush Railroad was chartered in 1845 and opened later that year, connecting Troy south to East Albany (now Rensselaer) on the east side of the Hudson River.

It was the last link in an all-rail line between Boston and Buffalo. Until bridges were built between Albany and Rensselaer, passengers crossed on ferries while the train went up to Troy, crossed the Hudson River, and came back down to Albany.

The Hudson River Railroad was chartered in 1846 to extend this line south to New York City; the full line opened in 1851. Prior to completion, the Hudson River leased the Troy and Greenbush.

The two railroad bridges crossing the Hudson River between Rensselaer and Albanywere owned nominally by a separate organization called The Hudson River Bridge Company at Albany, incorporated in 1856. This ownership was vested in The New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Company, three-fourths, and the Boston and Albany Railroad Company, one-fourth. Except for foot passengers, the bridges were used exclusively for railroad purposes. The north bridge (variously referred to as the Livingston Avenue Bridge or Freight Bridge) was opened in 1866, and the south bridge (variously referred to as the Maiden Lane Bridge or Passenger Bridge) in 1872.

The first railroad in New York State, and one of the first anywhere, was the Mohawk & Hudson, connecting Albany and Schenectady. The Rensselaer & Saratoga Rail Road followed in 1832, only a year later. Within twenty years, three more railroads came into Troy:
(1) Troy & Greenbush;
(2) Troy & Boston; and
(3)Troy & Schenectady.
The resulting congestion led to the formation of the Troy Union Railroad in 1851, owned jointly by the four roads. It opened in 1854. The tracks were moved from River Street to Sixth Avenue and a new station built. One of the lines was eventually bought by the D&H RR (Rensselaer & Saratoga RR), two were merged into the New York Central RR (Troy & Schenectady RR and the Troy & Greenbush RR), and the fourth became part of the Boston & Maine RR (Troy & Boston RR).

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How Home Ownership Became The Engine Of America Inequality

New York Times Magazine via California Rail News

Almost a decade removed from the foreclosure crisis that began in 2008, the nation is facing one of the worst affordable-housing shortages in generations. The standard of “affordable” housing is that which costs roughly 30 percent or less of a family’s income. Because of rising housing costs and stagnant wages, slightly more than half of all poor renting families in the country spend more than 50 percent of their income on housing costs, and at least one in four spends more than 70 percent. Yet America’s national housing policy gives affluent homeowners large benefits; middle-class homeowners, smaller benefits; and most renters, who are disproportionately poor, nothing. It is difficult to think of another social policy that more successfully multiplies America’s inequality in such a sweeping fashion.

Crossing Other Railroads AND BONUS: A Creamery!

Stissing Junction.

The ND&C tracks ran very near the P&C and P&E at McIntyre but did not actually connect. Farther north at Stissing Junction the P&E joined the ND&C. The P&E leased trackage rights on the ND&C from Stissing Junction to Pine Plains. The P&E was perpetually in financial trouble and often failed to pay the monthly rental fee. When the ND&C threatened to lock out the switches they would somehow come up with the money. In the above photo, the box car is on the ND&C tracks. The line at right is the P&E to Salt Point, Pleasant Valley and Poughkeepsie.

Of course in 1932 both of these lines actually belonged to the New Haven RR. Six years later these tracks were torn out and sold for scrap to Japan in 1938.

Attlebury tangent creamery ruins.

Near the north end of the tangent near Pine Plains is the ruins of a creamery. The ND&C RR ran on the left side of the building by the smokestack. There was a short siding on a ramp up to a door in the shadows at left.

A lot bigger than the milk shed further down the line.

Take a look at our WebSite to see more on Stissing Junction, the milk industry and many other fascinating subjects.

https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/cnendc-bangall-and-pine-plains/

The Milk Business Was Important To The ND&C

Milk stand at Arthursburg.

The dairy business was a big part of ND&C operations. Farmers would put milk in 10 gallon cans and bring the cans to a railroad pickup point. Trains would collect the cans and haul them to a local creamery for bottling and shipping to New York City. This stand was located in Arthursburg along the ND&C tracks. You can see part of route 82 behind the stand.

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Central New England Railway In New York State

Postcard View of Railroad Avenue in Hopewell Junction about 1910.

Stickels collection

The large building left of center is now the Hopewell Inn. The building farther to the left is now Geeks Place with route 376 making a sharp turn between the buildings. At far right is the Bordens Creamery while the depot, freight house and tower are in the distance. Note the old car parked in front of the store at left.

Find out more about the Central New England Railwayin New York State

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Great Map and More Links on Central New England Railway

The Central New England Railway at it’s maximum

Dutchess Northern Model Club collection

This map show the maximum extent of the CNE between 1905 and 1916.

Click HERE to enlarge

Check out the Central New England Railway for links to many topics
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Hoosac Tunnel to Troy

Penney Vanderbilt developed the map of Troy, including the Troy Union Railroad, when she was writing a blog about the Boston & Maine going through the Hoosac Tunnel to serve Troy. It shows important points like Troy Union Station, the Adams Street Freight House and the Green Island Bridge. Other blogs you might like include the

Troy Union Railroad Towers; abandonment of train service to Troy; and last but not least, the Troy Union Railroad.

Find out more about the Boston & Maine Railroad and Troy, New York

https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/boston-maine-railroad/

Billerica Name Game: Pan Am Rail

What is “PAR”? My understanding of various names of “Guilford”. Guilford Transportation Industries owned Guilford Rail Services which owned the Boston & Maine, Portland Terminal, and Maine Central railroads. Operations over these properties is conducted by the Springfield Terminal Railway. The B&M, MEC, and possibly the PTM remain in existance primarily as property owners. The name “Guilford” came from the Connecticut town, which was the residence of majority owner Timothy Mellon and David Fink, who became the chief operating officer. The railroad never operated there, as close as the company probably ever came was having some flyovers by their various air line operations. The Perma-Treat railroad tie plant in nearby Durham CT was owned by GTI, and is now AFAIK owned by Pan Am Systems. GTI is now Pan Am Systems, GRS is now Pan Am Railways. The airline operations, Pan Am and Boston-Maine Airways, have met with rather limited success and I believe the Pan Am operation is dormant. I believe that owner Tim Mellon is a licensed pilot and an airline enthusiast, probably is why he acquired the rights to the Pan Am name.

Find out more about the old Boston & Maine Railroad

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The Lehigh Valley Railroad Ran Even After It Died!

Highways, hurricanes and a drop in coal traffic made 1956 the last profitable year. Most passenger service was discontinued by 1959. Bankruptcy came in 1972 (3 days after Penn-Central). A substantial amount of trackage was declared redundant when CONRAIL took over the property in 1976. Between Sayre and Buffalo the only trackage remaining is that which serves local industry.

One section of the Valley still running is the Towanda-Monroeton Shippers Lifeline. This six-mile section is operated by a feed mill using an SW1 built in 1939 (painted in Lehigh Valley colors).

Recently purchased by The Reading, Blue Mountain and Northern Railroad Company.

Find even more stories on the Lehigh Valley Railroad

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