Category Archives: Chinese

Case Study: Shipping From China (As A Novice)

We are entering the shipping business! In an attempt to gain more information, we tried the “WEB”. Not having our “license” yet, I could not request an actual quote yet. FACT: Sailing time will only vary by only 2/3 days depending on the actual port of departure in China.

There are so many variables in planning a move. Type of equipment. Weather. Fuel prices. Think we will work with professionals.

Couple of facts I picked up:

Long Beach 20 days, but we will need a transcontinental rail trip.

New York/New Jersey 34 days??? Panama Canal or Europe?? Hard to believe 14 days to go through the new Panama Canal and go up to one of the rail ports on US seaboard.

It’s also possible to start a trip from the East Coast of United States, passing through the Panama Canal. This will add around 8-10 days to the journey.

Did pick up some good links to use. https://cargofromchina.com/sea-freight/#container-type gives ideas on container size.

Among the world’s top 10 ports in 2016, more than half are located in China, actually 7 of 10. Here’s a rundown.

Port Volume 2016 (‘000 TEUs) Rank in China Rank Worldwide
Shanghai 37 133 1 1
Shenzhen 23 979 2 3
Ningbo-Zhoushan 21 561 3 4
Hong Kong 19 813 4 5
Guangzhou 18 850 5 7
Qingdao 18 050 6 8
Tianjin 14 519 7 10
Dalian 8 15
Xiamen 9 16

Major Carriers – Top 16 Biggest Players
There are 79753 vessels totally, 5064 of them are containerships (data till 05-2017). Now the biggest container vessel has the capacity of more than 20,000 TEUs.

Here’s a table below showing the Top 16 Big Players in Container Shipping (06-2017).
Carrier Short Name Total TEU Share Flag Country
APM-Maersk MSK 3,358,346 16.1% Denmark
Mediterranean Shg Co MSC 3,056,560 14.6% Italy
CMA CGM Group CMA 2,316,751 11.1% France
COSCO Shipping Co Ltd COSCO 1,734,419 8.3% China
Hapag-Lloyd AG HPL 1,529,732 7.3% Germany
Evergreen Marine Corp. EMC 1,024,118 4.9% Taiwan
Orient Overseas Container Line OOCL 686,484 3.3% Hong Kong
NYK Line NYK 585,172 2.8% Japan
Yang Ming Marine Transport Corp. YML 581,431 2.8% Taiwan
Hamburg Süd Group HBS 562,764 2.7% Germany
MOL Liner MOL 518,185 2.5% Janpan
Pacific Int. Line PIL 371,833 1.8% Singpore
Hyundai M.M. HMM 366,692 1.8% Korea
“K” Line KLINE 358,498 1.7% Janpan
ZIM ZIM 340,976 1.6% Israel
Wan Hai Lines WHL 225,575 1.1% Taiwan

Click here to find your shipment transit time.


Very interesting exercise.

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China’s space-age rail network may be in pipeline

The Nation

BEIJING – Designers are investigating a revolutionary system that would employ magnetic levitation and hyperloops.

A poll recently conducted by Beijing Foreign Studies University showed that the speed and convenience offered by high-speed rail, online shopping, shared bikes and mobile phone-based payment apps are the four things young expats in China view most favourably.

And of those four items, it seems likely that high-speed rail will remain on the list for a long time as the country works to retain its place as the home of the world’s fastest trains. Now, Chinese designers are developing a bullet train capable of achieving a top speed of 400 kilometres per hour on conventional tracks, along with a magnetic levitation, or maglev, train that is expected to run at 600 km/h.

The country is even considering the possibility of building a system based on a transnational tube that would allow specially designed trains to travel at 4,000 km/h.

Last month, designers at China Aerospace Science and Industry Corp, one of the country’s biggest space contractors, announced that they had started research and development work on a futuristic ultrafast transportation system popularly known as a hyperloop.

The CASIC hyperloop will see maglev lines running in partially elevated tubes or tunnels along which streamlined, engineless trains will travel at speeds of 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000 km/h, according to Mao Kai, chief designer of the system at CASIC. So far, there is no indication of how much such a system would cost.

By comparison, China’s fastest wheeled train in commercial operation travels at about 350 km/h, while large commercial jetliners usually fly at 900 to 1,000 km/h.

The highest speed ever achieved by a railway vehicle was 603 km/h. That record was set during a test run of the Japanese L0 Series superconducting maglev in April 2015. However, the fastest operating speed of a commercial rail vehicle is 430 km/h, and was attained by the Transrapid maglev, developed in Germany, on a 30.5 km stretch of line that runs to the Pudong International Airport in Shanghai.

CASIC is the first Chinese enterprise to begin developing a hyperloop system capable of allowing trains to travel at 1,000 km/h or faster.

Depth of experience

The project will benefit from the company’s experience in systems engineering and supersonic vehicles, CASIC said in a statement. The company is the third in the world to embark on such a venture, following Hyperloop Transportation Technologies and Hyperloop One in the United States.

Mao said CASIC is working with more than 20 institutes at home and abroad on the project and its technicians are striving to develop key technologies, such as those required to construct elevated hyperloop tube systems.

He added that once the project has been developed sufficiently, CASIC plans to construct a short line for trial runs for the 1,000 km/h version.

The 1,000 km/h and 2,000 km/h versions of the system would be used for intercity travel, while the 4,000 km/h version would form part of a transnational ultrafast transportation network, according to Mao.

“The reason we are eager to develop a 4,000 km/h version is that we believe such a line is technologically feasible, and that it will have business potential in terms of long-distance transportation in the future,” he said. “Of course, safety and comfort will be at the top on our agenda when we develop hyperloop lines.”

The maglev train’s acceleration and deceleration within the tube would have to be relatively gradual and smooth to ensure passenger comfort, he said. Moreover, landforms and engineering considerations would determine what proportion of the line would be aboveground and how much would run underground.

Research competition

Zhai Wanming, an academician at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and a professor of traction power at Southwest Jiaotong University in Chengdu, Sichuan province, previously told Xinhua News Agency that when trains travel at 400 km/h or faster more than 80 per cent of its traction power is used to counter air resistance. Therefore, a train can only maintain ultrafast speeds by running within a partially elevated tube, he said.

The idea of using magnetic levitation within a partial vacuum to carry people or cargo was floated by scientists many years ago. However, it gained new traction in 2012 when tech tycoon Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla, announced his ambition to build a hyperloop between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

Hyperloop Transportation Technologies and Hyperloop One have designed and produced prototypes and have signed agreements with several countries to conduct feasibility studies, according to media reports.

In May 2014, Southwest Jiaotong University announced that it had built the world’s first experimental elevated loop tube for technological demonstrations of a high-temperature superconducting maglev vehicle it has developed.

A senior Chinese maglev scientist, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said vehicles reached constant speeds of 40 to 50 km/h during trial runs in the university’s loop tube that were conducted to assess the system’s overall design and resistance to vibration.

The scientist, who is close to the university’s research program, said the college plans to develop vehicles capable of running at 400 km/h in a partially elevated loop tube. He added that the institute is also in talks with provincial authorities regarding research and development of a next-generation maglev/tube system with an estimated speed of about 1,200 km/h.

With regard to the feasibility of CASIC’s hyperloop plans, the scientist said the company’s researchers will need to address a number of technical issues, including communications and equipment-cooling techniques in an elevated environment.

“Moreover, CASIC will have to pay great attention to its project’s profitability. My estimation is that the 1,000 km/h version will be economically and technically feasible,” he said.

“Of course, from a technical perspective, the 4,000 km/h model could also become a reality if the engineers are able to work out solutions to issues related to propulsion, levitation and control.”

Those points were echoed by Zhao Lin, an associate researcher at the National Laboratory for Superconductivity at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Zhao said any enterprise that is seriously considering investing in a hyperloop system will have to take a wealth of factors into consideration.

“For example, the ultrafast speed would generate a lot of demands on the track and the material from which the maglev system is made. In addition, the cost of constructing and maintaining a long-distance, elevated tube would be extremely high,” he said.

‘Traditional’ approach

Even before CASIC announced its hyperloop program, engineers at the State-owned railcar manufacturer CRRC Corp, the world’s largest train maker, had started developing a new-generation bullet train with an operating speed of 400 km/h, which will probably become the fastest train in service on the planet.

It will be deployed on a series of new lines the government is planning to connect nations participating in the Belt and Road Initiative, a multinational economic venture proposed by President Xi Jinping in 2013.

The initiative consists of the Silk Road Economic Belt, which will link China with Europe via Central and Western Asia, and the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road, which will stretch from southern China across Southeast Asia, and even to Africa. The government estimates that the initiative could benefit approximately 4.4 billion people in 65 nations.

The axles and wheels of CRRC’s new bullet train will be designed so they can be adjusted to fit a range of track gauges used outside China.

At present, goods can only continue their journeys after they have been transferred to rolling stock with the appropriate gauges when they cross national borders, according to professor Jia Limin of Beijing Jiaotong University, who heads China’s high-speed railway innovation program, in an earlier interview with China Daily.

Experts have also been testing an ultrafast bullet train capable of travelling at about 600 km/h, but its designers have stressed that it has been built to test next-generation railway technologies rather than for commercial use.

Moreover, CRRC is designing two types of maglev-a 600 km/h high-speed version and a 200 km/h mid-speed version. The company expects to put them into service sometime around 2021, according to the designers.

At present, China operates 124,000 km of rail lines. That figure includes more than 22,000 km of high-speed track, about 60 per cent of the global total.

Every day, at least 4 million people use the nation’s high-speed trains, accounting for 50 per cent of daily user numbers on the country’s entire rail network

China wants to develop the trains of the future

The state-owned China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC) has claimed it plans to develop the next generation of trains, which can travel at speeds of up to 2,500mph.

Liu Shiquan, a deputy general manager at CASC, said their scientists would be looking to develop the super-fast trains of the future that could “fly on the ground”.

“The corporation has built rich experience and accumulated technological know-how through major projects, and it has the capabilities in simulation, modelling and experimentation for large-scale projects, as well as the world-class design capability for supersonic aircraft, all of which lay the important ground for the super-fast train project,” state-owned website The Paper wrote of CASC’s plans.

With connections to China’s defence ministry, CASC has already been involved in developing satellites, rockets and missiles; now plans are afoot to turn its futuristic tech closer to home.

China already has the largest network of high speed trains in the world, and is obviously keen to continue outstripping the competition. CASC officials have said they will work with more than 20 other research institutes, both domestic and international, in the quest to create the proposed 2,500mph trains.

Although the ‘flying train’ may be a way off becoming a reality, Chinese scientists also announced plans for an intercity train that can travel at more than 600mph – clearly designed to compete with American Canadian inventor Elon Musk’s hyperloop concept, which uses air instead of wheels and could result in speeds of more than 700mph. No date has been announced for when the hyperloop will be fully up and running, but earlier this week Musk shared footage of a test pod accelerating to 200mph in a few seconds as part of a competition to design pods for the high-speed system.

The Independent

China’s latest bullet trains will reach a blazing 400 km/h, faster than the Hyperloop One

China has officially reclaimed the title for world’s fastest train.

Come September 21, new bullet trains will be blazing their way across China at speeds of up to 400 km/h (248 mph).

Consider this China’s comeback, after a two-train collision in 2011 that killed 40 people. The top speed at the time was 350 km/h, but authorities throttled them to 300 km/h after the fatal accident.

The new trains will be returning to the 350 km/h speed, but according to state news outlet Xinhua, they’re capable of going even faster, at a maximum speed of 400 km/h.

To put that into context, here are some things that are slower than China’s new bullet trains:

(1) The Hyperloop One (so far)
The Hyperloop One, which is still in development, reached a speed record of 308 km/h (191 mph) earlier this year.
But stay tuned, it hopes to eventually hit its planned mark of 1,200 km/h in the future.

(2)A McLaren F1 car
The McLaren F1 XP5 set a world record for the world’s fastest production car in 1998, reaching 386m/h (240 mph). It went on to hold the title for more than a decade.

(3) A Peregrine falcon
Also known as the fastest bird in the world, the Peregrine falcon can go up to a staggering 389km/h (242 mph) when it is diving down to catch prey.

Mashable Tech