Category Archives: ny central railroad

Comments On Mark Tomlinson’s NY Central Dates

June 23, 1831 The Boston & Worcester Railroad Corporation incorporates in Massachusetts. It is the oldest element of the New York Central system in New England. See more on the formation of the Boston & Albany Railroad.
https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/boston-albany-railroad/

June 23, 1954 Robert Heller & Associates present the result of their passenger train study to representatives of the Pennsylvania, New York Central and Baltimore & Ohio railroads. The study finds that passengers are leaving trains for automobiles and airplanes and the railroads are unable to price their services by cost because so many of the rates are frozen by regulations. The railroads decline to follow any of the study’s recommendations to consolidate long-distance trains. Most of the study’s recommendations will be made under Amtrak.
Interesting since June 1954 is when Robert Young became new CEO of the NY Central.

June 22, 1918 In Hammond IN, a Michigan Central engineer taking an empty troop train from Kalamazoo to Chicago falls asleep at the throttle. A Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus train in front of him was not yet clear of the main. He plows into it at 60 mph. Eighty-six people are killed and 127 injured.
Worst circus train wreck in United States history. In a quiet cemetery outside Chicago lies a mass grave of clowns, strongmen, and acrobats who died in one of the worst circus tragedies in history. Surrounded by five distinctive elephant statues, their trunks lowered to symbolize mourning—known as Showmen’s Rest. The burial plot was purchased by the Showmen’s League of America, an international association of carnival performers founded in 1913 with Buffalo Bill Cody as its first president. When they purchased the section of plots as a resting place for their fallen members, no one expected how soon they’d need it.

June 22, 1929 The New York Central holds dedication ceremonies for its new “Central Terminal” at Buffalo. The modified Art Deco style terminal includes seven platforms serving fourteen station tracks. Revenue operation will begin tomorrow.
After 1929 Buffalo changed, railroads changed and the World changed.

June 21, 1948 Alco delivers its last steam locomotive: Pittsburgh & Lake Erie 2-8-4 #9406.
Yes, NY Central System was large scale ALCO buyer

June 20, 1875 The New York Central & Hudson River Railroad opens the entire Fourth Avenue Improvement in New York City with two of the eventual four tracks in service. The project eliminates grade crossings between Grand Central Station and Harlem River.
Yes, BIG INVESTMENT

June 20, 1913 The New York Central & Hudson River Railroad begins using Harmon as its steam-to-electric transfer point.
Wise move. Harmon still important to Metro North who now runs old NY Central servicen Hudson Line

The 20th Century Limited Over The Years

More from Mark Tomlonson on June 15 in NYC History

June 15, 1902 The New York Central & Hudson River Railroad’s “20th Century Limited”, “a train a century ahead of its time” according to contemporary accounts, begins operation. The average speed is 49 mph between New York and Chicago resulting in a 20-hour journey.

June 15, 1938 The “20th Century Limited” is equipped with new streamlined equipment and a new schedule that averages 60 mph.

The 1938 picture again.

Wonder how many times these updates happened?

Most of my knowledge is on this WebSite
https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/20th-century-limited/

Here is about George H. Daniels who started the famous train
https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/railroader-biographies-george-h-daniels/

History: Robert Young Takes Over The New York Central

Going back to follow my practice of commenting on Mark Tomlonson’s “DAY In NY Central History”

One item stood out in my mind:
“June 14, 1954 Robert R. Young officially gains control of the New York Central. Harold S. Vanderbilt is forced out, the last Vanderbilt to serve the New York Central.”

My boss (who was around in 1954) commented that June 14 was too late for the ANNUAL MEETING. “ALPHABET IT”

Well! I found a great source of information:

A GENERAL CHRONOLOGY OF THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD COMPANY ITS PREDECESSORS AND SUCCESSORS ANDITS HISTORICAL CONTEXT
By Christopher T. Baer
1954
April 2015 Edition
All data subject to correction and change
http://www.prrths.com/newprr_files/Hagley/PRR1954.pdf

Thank you Mr. Baer!!! As well as Pennsylvania RR, he covers much other railroad-related material.

1954 was BUSY with the “takeover”. Sale of NY Central Stock, etc, etc.
Al Perlman “not knowing” Mr. Young, etc.

Then I found it!

May 26, 1954
NYC holds annual meeting at Washington Avenue Armory in Albany after
Court of Appeals refuses to block Alleghany Corporation from voting its
800,000 Murchison shares at the last minute; 2,200 attend, most traveling on two special trains from Grand Central Terminal; both Robert R. Young and Pres. William White work the crowds on the trains hoping to influence votes at the last minute.

My boss thanked me but added, there was a third train to Albany from the West (Cleveland?)

Now I could not resist to find more cool stories from 1954:

Jan. 3, 1954 Last run of a Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac Railroad steam locomotive, 4-8-4 No. 622 Carter Braxton, out of Washington Union Station on a holiday mail or passenger extra.

Jan. 4, 1954 New Haven asks ICC for 33% increase in interstate and New York commuter fares.

Jan. 15, 1954 Robert R. Young calls on Harold S. Vanderbilt at Palm Beach and tells him that he and Allan P. Kirby are “getting out of C&O” and buying heavily into NYC.

Jan. 16, 1954 Robert R. Young informs Harold S. Vanderbilt (1884-1970) that he has bought into NYC and implies he will run for Chairman.

Jan. 19, 1954 Alleghany Corporation sells its entire holding of 104,854 shares of Chesapeake & Ohio Railway stock to Cleveland financier Cyrus Stephen Eaton (1883-1979), who becomes Chairman in place of Robert R. Young; Young and other Alleghany Corporation directors announce they have
resigned as directors of C&O.

Jan. 20, 1954 Robert R. Young and Allan P. Kirby of Alleghany Corporation announce they have become “substantial” stockholders of NYC.

Jan. 20, 1954 Lehigh Valley Railroad resumes dividend payments for the first time since 1932.

Jan. 21, 1954 NYC Pres. William White announces his plan for developing piggyback service with Rail-Trailer Company of Chicago.

Feb. 2, 1954 Robert R. Young meets with NYC Pres. William White and VP-Finance Willard F. Place at the Cloud Club in the Chrysler Building; offers to retain both if he wins control, providing that he is made Chairman and CEO; White is non-committal.

Feb. 4, 1954 Federal Judge Harold R. Medina (1888- ) files his ruling in U.S. v. Henry S. Morgan, et al., dismissing the Justice Department’s antitrust case against 17 investment banking firms for lack of evidence; the evidence shows no case of combination or conspiracy, and in fact shows active competition among all investment bankers; Medina dismisses the case “with prejudice,” preventing the government from retrying the case short of bringing a whole new set of charges; Robert R. Young continues to charge that Medina is biased in favor of the banks.

Feb. 9, 1954 Robert R. Young and Allan P. Kirby publicly ask for seats on the NYC Board and for Young to be elected to the vacant post of Chairman.

Feb. 10, 1954 NYC Board turns down Young’s request for seats; Young announces a proxy fight for the next annual meeting; denounces Morgan control of NYC.

Feb. 15, 1954 Robert R. Young arrives at Penn Station from Palm Beach and before a group of reporters launches his campaign to capture the NYC.

Feb. 16, 1954 Robert R. Young places ads in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal asking for nominations to serve on his projected NYC “Ownership Board of Directors”; the NYC counters by hiring the best advertising agencies and proxy solicitors, as well as deploying its own legal staff; Young relies on Thomas J. Deegan, who resigns as the Chesapeake & Ohio’s VP of Public Relations & Advertising to manage the campaign, and the law firm of Lord, Day & Lord

Feb. 18, 1954 SEC holds hearings on its proposed relaxation of Rule U-50 covering competitive bidding for securities issues; the move is supported by the major Wall Street investment banks and opposed by Robert R. Young, Otis & Co. (Cyrus S. Eaton’s firm), Halsey, Stuart & Co. and the CIO; the SEC eventually backs down and declines to adopt the proposed amendment on
July 2, 1956.

Feb. 19, 1954 Young announces he will appoint a woman to NYC Board.

Feb. 23, 1954 Chesapeake & Ohio Railway sells its 800,000 shares of NYC which are held in a voting trust by Chase National Bank, and thus could be voted by them against Robert R. Young, to Clint W. Murchison (1895-1969) of Dallas and Sid W. Richardson (1891-1959) of Fort Worth, two very wealthy Texas oilman friends of Young’s, for $20 million; Alleghany Corporation loans the Texans $7.5 million of purchase price, money which it has to borrow; Kirby loans $5 million; Cleveland banks loan another $7.5 million under a contractthat protects the Texans against loss; Alleghany Corporation receives a “put” option to purchase at least 400,000 shares at $25 between July 15 and Sep.15, the same price paid by the Texans.

Feb. 24, 1954 NYC Pres. William White issues the first public notice of the Chesapeake & Ohio’s sale of its NYC stock and tries to show that Robert R. Young still controls the policy of the C&O.

Feb. 25, 1954 Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Board approves the sale of its NYC stock to Clint W. Murchison and Sid W. Richardson.

Mar. 2, 1954 Robert R. Young announces his slate of directors for the NYC election.

Mar. 3, 1954 NYC asks ICC to investigate Young’s tactics, particularly the Murchison sale and whether Young still controls the C&O through Cyrus S. Eaton.

Mar. 3, 1954 Alleghany Corporation and Robert R. Young place full page ads in the New York Times and other papers reminding how they had forced competitive bidding for railroad securities and broke the monopoly of J.P. Morgan and Kuhn, Loeb & Co.

Mar. 4, 1954 Young sues to block NYC directors from spending company money to oppose his election.

Mar. 18, 1954 Sen. William Langer (1886-1959), Republican of North Dakota and,Chairman of the Judiciary Committee, writes to ICC in support of Robert R. Young’s bid to capture NYC and asks for investigation of interlocking relationships between PRR, NYC and B&O and (shades of 1913) J.P. Morgan & Co., the First National Bank of New York, the Chase National Bank and the Mellon National Bank.

Mar. 21, 1954 Robert R. Young announces he will appoint Mrs. Lila Bell Acheson Wallace, co-owner with her husband of Reader’s Digest and the NYC’s first woman,director; other nominees are William H. Landers, a retired NYC engineer; Young chooses persons who will appeal to all ethnic and occupational groups among the many small NYC stockholders.

Mar. 29, 1954 At a luncheon conference, Robert R. Young speaks favorably of Alfred E. Perlman (1902-1983), who has rehabilitated the Denver & Rio Grande Western, as the type of progressive railroad he would like as the NYC Pres.; he is misquoted as saying he intends to make Perlman Pres.

Mar. 30, 1954 Alfred E. Perlman denies having an offer from Young or even knowing him.

Mar. 31, 1954 Last run of passenger service on NYC’s Catskill Mountain Branch between Oneonta and Kingston, N.Y., once served by through cars from Philadelphia over the PRR and West Shore Railroad.

Apr. 6, 1954 ICC refuses the NYC’s petition to investigate the C&O’s sale of NYC shares, to Murchison and Richardson.

Apr. 7, 1954 Sadie Zenn, who owns 500 shares of Alleghany Corporation, sues the management and Murchison and Richardson on the grounds that the sale was detrimental to Alleghany’s interest and calling for Murchison and Richardson to repay the loans in cash.

Apr. 1954 May issue of Fortune carries an anti-Young editorial, “The Sound and Fury of Robert R. Young”; NYC directors distribute copies in violation of copyright law, feeling that publicity is worth the fine.

May 4, 1954 Time Inc. sues NYC, charging it reprinted the Fortune editorial against Robert R. Young without its consent

May 18, 1954 N.Y. Appellate Court orders Chase National Bank issue a proxy to Murchison and Richardson for the NYC shares purchased from the C&O.

May 19, 1954 ICC refuses the plea of NYC and Harold S. Vanderbilt to order Robert R. Young to file a takeover application with it.

May 25, 1954 Robert R. Young first meets with Alfred E. Perlman, his candidate for chief operating officer; Perlman is currently vice president of Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad, which he had rehabilitated.

ENOUGH FOR NOW
See https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/robert-r-young/

New/Improved Dates About NY Central History

For a long time, Mark Tomlinson has commented about Important Dates In NY Central History. For a while we followed him and commented/added material on his stories. Then we got tied up with HYPERLOOP, 2nd Avenue Subway, Florida East Coast BRIGHTLINERS, etc. WELL, Mark picked up the ball and added new dates and added descriptions.

Did not have 1938 Century picture for display, so our Featured Image is the 1938 20th Century floating past Studebaker in South Bend, Indiana. Probably just after June 13, 1938.

June 13, 1845 The Troy & Greenbush Railroad (later NYC) opens between its namesake New York towns. It is the last link in an all-rail line between Boston and Buffalo. We just created a new WebPage on the Troy & Greenbush Railroad. https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/troy-greenbush-railroad/

June 9, 2009 A half-mile segment of the former New York Central’s elevated line on the west side of Manhattan is opened as a park. The rails remain in place in a rail bank, even though no train has used the line since 1980.


See more on the West Side Rail Line
https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/west-side-freight-line/

June 11, 1872 The first American railroad YMCA is established at Cleveland Union Depot under the patronage of James H. Devereaux of the Vanderbilt Lines. Train dispatcher Henry W. Stager is the founder of the railroad YMCA movement, which aims to provide safe and clean housing for railroad crews laying over at distant terminals. Below is a “meal ticket” from the Selkirk YMCA

Troy & Greenbush Railroad

The Troy and Greenbush Railroad was chartered in 1845 and opened later that year, connecting Troy south to East Albany (now Rensselaer) on the east side of the Hudson River.

It was the last link in an all-rail line between Boston and Buffalo. Until bridges were built between Albany and Rensselaer, passengers crossed on ferries while the train went up to Troy, crossed the Hudson River, and came back down to Albany.

The Hudson River Railroad was chartered in 1846 to extend this line south to New York City; the full line opened in 1851. Prior to completion, the Hudson River leased the Troy and Greenbush.

The two railroad bridges crossing the Hudson River between Rensselaer and Albanywere owned nominally by a separate organization called The Hudson River Bridge Company at Albany, incorporated in 1856. This ownership was vested in The New York Central and Hudson River Railroad Company, three-fourths, and the Boston and Albany Railroad Company, one-fourth. Except for foot passengers, the bridges were used exclusively for railroad purposes. The north bridge (variously referred to as the Livingston Avenue Bridge or Freight Bridge) was opened in 1866, and the south bridge (variously referred to as the Maiden Lane Bridge or Passenger Bridge) in 1872.

The first railroad in New York State, and one of the first anywhere, was the Mohawk & Hudson, connecting Albany and Schenectady. The Rensselaer & Saratoga Rail Road followed in 1832, only a year later. Within twenty years, three more railroads came into Troy:
(1) Troy & Greenbush;
(2) Troy & Boston; and
(3)Troy & Schenectady.
The resulting congestion led to the formation of the Troy Union Railroad in 1851, owned jointly by the four roads. It opened in 1854. The tracks were moved from River Street to Sixth Avenue and a new station built. One of the lines was eventually bought by the D&H RR (Rensselaer & Saratoga RR), two were merged into the New York Central RR (Troy & Schenectady RR and the Troy & Greenbush RR), and the fourth became part of the Boston & Maine RR (Troy & Boston RR).

See our full WebSite
https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/troy-greenbush-railroad/

Ogdensburg Car Ferry

The Ogdensburg-Prescott carferry is a New York Central “unremarked operation”. The tug and barge used at the end were built as a pair in 1930. There are photos available from 1948 that show mostly coal being moved. However there is a photo in George Hilton’s book “Great Lakes Carferries” which shows a more mixed load. The 1955 traffic figures were: from CP 3030 loads, 2625 empties and to the CP 3150 loads and 503 empties. Apparently this traffic was un-balanced and used more by the CP. From the CP was very likely paper products and perhaps some lumber and a bit of oil product in addition to the empties being returned to the Central “at the nearest junction point”. CP received coal, but also chemicals, produce, and a variety of manufactured goods in box cars. The completion of the bridge over the St. Lawrence pretty much killed it off. A railroad receives no revenue for switching operations of which this could have been considered one, and an expensive one at that, so the PC together with the CP no doubt killed this operation off as fast as they could once an alternative was available to justify its termination.

Now that we know the car ferry carried mostly coal traffic, the next question is: which route into Ogdensburg did the NYC use to get to and from the ferry? Was it the line from DeKalb Jct or the line up from Philadelphia? I know there was a local which served the line from Philadephia, but what about the line from DeKalb Jct? Did the yard switcher in Ogdensburg also go to DeKalb Jct to bring back cars?

This is only a guess, but if the DeKalb – Ogdensburg track was kept in longer, could it have been the primary track used and the one out of Philadelphia was the track that was for local traffic? Especially since after the abandonment along the river, a small spur was maintained. It was a shorter route as well.

At one point freight between Watertown and Ogdensburg was sent via DeKalb Jct. Any freight service at that time for the line to Phila. was handled by a mixed train. In 1956 the pattern had been changed. A freight ran on the former U&BR line between Philadelphia and Ogdensburg. A local ran from Ogdensburg to DeKalb Jct and back. The St. Lawrence Division was partly abandoned on October 28, 1956, when the New York Central Railroad abandoned the original St. Lawrence Division from Ogdensburg to Redwood, leaving a short spur in Ogdensburg attached to the Ogdensburg Branch.

Summary of the Ogdensburg/Dekalb Line:
1862 – opened by Rome, Watertown & Ogdensburg RR
1891, Mar. 14 – leased by NYC
1913, Apr. 16 – becomes NYC
1968, Feb. 1 – becomes PNYC
1969, Oct. 1 – becomes PC
1976, Apr. 1 – becomes Conrail, but is operated by Ogdensburg & Norwood Ry
1977, Apr. 1 – operated by St. Lawrence RR
1978 – back to Conrail
1980, March – operated by North Country Ry
1981, March – back to Conrail
1981, Dec. 10 – sold to Ontario Eastern RR
1985 – abandoned
1986(7) – rails removed

Why Did The Penn Central Railroad Fail?

The Penn Central was born amid great expectations and promises on February 1,1968 by the merger of the New York Central System into the Pennsylvania Railroad on that date.

Neither railroad had been forced through the trauma of bankruptcy and reorganization.

With incompatible computer systems ,signal systems, operating styles, and personalities at the top, the new railroad remained essentially two in operation though it was one in name.

1.) PC was forced to pay $125 million for the bankrupt New Haven, which had a negative cash flow.

2.) PC was required to operate well over one half of all the passenger service in the US, which by that time had a monstrous negative cash flow. Amtrak only partly relieved this in 1971, as PC was still saddled with commuter service in the New York and Philadelphia areas.

3.) Freight rates and abandonments were rigidly regulated, preventing PC and others from adapting to market conditions.

4.) The “red” and “green” teams were more interested in “oneupmanship” than creating a viable enterprise. No thought had been given prior to the merger, for example, on compatibility of computer reporting systems.

The merger between the New York Central RR and the Pennsylvania RR was like a shotgun wedding. Both bride and groom hated each other. Yet, there was no other option but to join hands in unholy matrimony, and if this wasn’t bad enough, the bride and groom had to accept the New Haven RR as an unwelcome boarder in their honeymoon suite.

Read More About The Wreck Of The Penn Central Railroad

https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/penn-central-a-wreck-of-a-railroad/

An Older Rail “Chicago Bypass”

If you have been following us for a while, we ALWAYS keep talking about a “mythological” Chicago Bypass.

As late as 1964 there was a great one: The Kankakee Belt Route is the nickname for the Illinois Division of the New York Central Railroad, which extended from South Bend, Indiana, through Kankakee, Illinois, and westward to Zearing, Illinois. It was marketed as the “Kankakee Belt” route to connect with western railroads and avoid the congestion of the Chicago area.

Today, the Norfolk Southern operates the Kankakee Belt Route (ex-Conrail, ex-NYC, Kankakee Belt Line). Sections at the east end (to South Bend) and West End (Zearing area) have been removed. The Kankakee Belt Route sees around eight to ten trains daily, from the BNSF (old AT&SF main line) at Streator, Illinois to Norfolk Southern Railway interchanges and facilities in Indiana. It still serves as a Chicago bypass.

It’s gone now although sections remain. Many of the connecting railroads have disappeared!

The Kankakee Belt Line and connections (1964)

Location Railroad
South Bend, Indiana New York Central and Grand Trunk Railway
North Liberty, Indiana Wabash
Walkerton, Indiana B&O and Nickel Plate
Hamlet, Indiana Pennsylvania
Knox, Indiana Nickel Plate
North Judson, Indiana Pennsylvania and Erie
San Pierre, Indiana Monon
Shelby, Indiana Monon
Schneider, Indiana New York Central
Delmar, Illinois Milwaukee
Momence, Illinois Chicago & Eastern Illinois
Kankakee, Illinois Illinois Central and New York Central
Reddick, Illinois Wabash
Dwight, Illinois GM&O (Alton)
Streator, Illinois Santa Fe, Burlington
Lostant, Illinois Illinois Central
Depue, Illinois Rock Island
Ladd, Illinois Northwestern, Milwaukee, LS&BC RR
Zearing, Illinois Burlington

Follow our WebSite on Chicago connections

New York Central Song

“Twilight of American Rail Travel” means different things to different people. To me, it meant the period in the 1960’s until Amtrak when passenger service went downhill. More specifically, it was the “Empire Corridor” running along the Mohawk and Hudson Rivers to New York City. Before the “twilight”, well maintained, well patronized New York Central trains ran this route.

My favorite song is

“City of New Orleans” written by Steve Goodman and sung by Arlo Guthrie. It talks about the same period, but on the Illinois Central Railroad. Lots of similarities!

“Riding on the City of New Orleans, Illinois Central Monday morning rail Fifteen cars and fifteen restless riders,”

Yes, rode on train like that too. Although lot of those cars were “head end equipment”.

“Three conductors and twenty-five sacks of mail.”

Loss of that mail was what really did in rail passenger service. Always heard stories of how President Lyndon Johnson pulled the mail off trains to pay off his airline buddies for political favors. Imagine! Entrusting our mail to people who seem incapable of moving our luggage between two cities and not losing it!

“All along the southbound odyssey. The train pulls out at Kankakee. Rolls along past houses, farms and fields. Passin’ trains that have no names, Freight yards full of old black men And the graveyards of the rusted automobiles.”

Yes, the Hudson Valley was in the process of change. Industry was gone and the “yuppies” (“millenials”) had not yet built their country homes. Lot of abandoned factories, rusted rail sidings.

“Good morning America how are you? Don’t you know me I’m your native son, I’m the train they call The City of New Orleans, I’ll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.”

Yes, the New York Central, was New York State’s Native Son. It was one of the biggest factors in making New York great.

“Dealin’ card games with the old men in the club car. Penny a point ain’t no one keepin’ score. Pass the paper bag that holds the bottle. Feel the wheels rumblin’ ‘neath the floor. And the sons of pullman porters And the sons of engineers Ride their father’s magic carpets made of steel. Mothers with their babes asleep, Are rockin’ to the gentle beat And the rhythm of the rails is all they feel.”

Never any offense to the train crews. Railroad problems came instead from “greed run rampant” at railroad headquarters in Philadelphia. Passengers were only the ones who hadn’t or couldn’t get enamoured with America’s “Car Culture”.

“Nighttime on The City of New Orleans, Changing cars in Memphis, Tennessee. Half way home, we’ll be there by morning.”

How about changing engines at Harmon?

The beautiful (ugly to many) P-Motor is waiting for an East-bound passenger train to go 33 miles right into the heart of New York City. Does not matter how many diesels pulled the train from Chicago. The single P-Motor can pull it! Thanks to Wayne Koch for great photo.

“Through the Mississippi darkness Rolling down to the sea. And all the towns and people seem To fade into a bad dream And the steel rails still ain’t heard the news. The conductor sings his song again, The passengers will please refrain This train’s got the disappearing railroad blues.”

Even the huge Chevrolet plant in North Tarrytown would be gone by the end of the 20th Century and turned into condos!

“Good night, America, how are you? Don’t you know me I’m your native son, I’m the train they call The City of New Orleans, I’ll be gone five hundred miles when the day is done.”

Good night New York Central!

See Penney Vanderbilt’s Blog on Arlo Guthrie and Alice’s Restaurant

You will also be interested in our page on the 20th Century Limited

The End Of The Troy Union Railroad

The only reason for retaining the Troy passenger station at the bitter end was the remnant of B&M service from Boston with one or two Budd RDC’s. The NYC and D&H had the alternative of using Albany as their passenger interchange, and actually it switched back and forth between Albany and Troy for individual trains over the years. The B&M had nothing but Troy.

The D&H preferred Troy over Albany, because the distance from Colonie Shops (the Capital District locomotive service point and crew HQ) was shorter to Troy, and then they didn’t have to run the North Albany Yard Engine to Albany to handle the occasional passenger switching. The Troy Station Switcher (NYCRR crew) was in the station anyway. I don’t think the individual railroads paid for it per move, just a on a fixed percentage.

NYC preferred Albany, because it avoided running light engines the longer distance between Troy and Rensselaer, their locomotive service point, if they didn’t come back with a train.

The D&H paid NYC to use the upper level at Albany on a pro-rata basis, but, all three railroads that owned the Troy Union RR paid a fixed percent of the operating expenses. NYC paid 50%, D&H and B&M 25% each, because NYC took over the ownership of two predecssor RR’s – the Troy and Greenbush and the Troy and Schenectady. The Rutland had no ownership – they operated as B&M trains between White Creek and Troy.

The passenger station was demolished as soon as the last B&M train left town, mostly to avoid the high property taxes levied on railroad property in New York State. The Troy Union RR employees once said, only half in jest, that they knew the end was near when they put a new roof on the station. That was usually the kiss of death for any railroad building.

A serious problem that always plagued Troy was the number of highway grade crossings in the city. Every switching move blocked Fulton Street or Broadway, and the TURR needed about ten crossing watchmen per trick, or a total of more than 40 for the 24/7 passenger operation.

As for the demolition of Troy Union Station, the last passenger service left town in January of 1958 and it was demolished by the end of the summer that same year. So, no, there was never a post-classic- era shack.

Probably the reason Troy lost its direct passenger service relativley early is because it wasn’t far from more-than-adequate remaining service in Albany (7 miles, and with good local transit connections) . The cost saving from shutting down TUS was probably enormous.

Around 1959 D&H and NYC had brought running B&M to Albany, but they couldn’t make an agreement with the operating brotherhoods to allow B&M crews to run to Albany. It wouldn’t work out if a D&H crew had to take the train over that distance. The B&M wasn’t about to put any more money into maintaining that service west of Fitchburg, and this was another good reason for them to dump it.

Either way, the B&M would have had to either run via TURR to the NYC at Madison Street or to the D&H via the Green Island Bridge, and they would have still needed most of the TURR with all of its crossings, and the Green Island Bridge. A route via Mechanicville would not have worked, either. All three railroads wanted to be shed of the entire TURR, not only the station, and the best way to get regulatory approval was to let the expenses pile up and then dump the whole thing. The only fly in the ointment was the Rutland operation, and when that went away in 1961 the fate of the TURR was sealed.

Read more about the Troy Union Railroad

https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/troy-schenectady-railroad/