Tag Archives: trolley

SEPTA preps for trolley line track renewal

The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) on Sunday will begin a track renewal project on a portion of its Route 15 trolley line.

The project will take place at various points on Girard Avenue in Philadelphia and be completed by Sept. 3.

Some track in the area dates to the 1940s, while other track was installed in the 1950s and 1970s, SEPTA officials said in a press release. The street structure supporting the track has deteriorated due to weather, traffic and age. The agency will excavate and replace about 9,800 track feet and repave the track area.

The new track will result in reduced sound and vibration because the new rail is incased in an insulated rubber boot.

Additionally, the new track components will result in a smoother ride for passengers, SEPTA officials said.

How did one get to the Pentagon in 1944?

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Recently, an author writing a book asked us how his “character” would have gone by train from Chicago to the Pentagon in 1944.The Pennsylvania Railroad (and all other railroads entering Washington DC) used Union Station. The formerly huge rail yard near the Pentagon, “Pot Yard”, was freight-only.

We took a look at DC Transit map and nothing shows as going across to the Pentagon. 1958 and 1944 are identical. This was the main trolley provider in DC. I confirmed this with .

Took a look at another map.

and found an interurban line that crosses the river at Arlington Junction and connects with DC Transit. So their MIGHT have been a rail route. But these interurbans were “on their knees” after the Depression and could not gear up to adequately serve the Pentagon. More discussion on topic:

I’m guessing the Army (did they control the Pentagon before there was a Department of Defense???) set up some bus routes. Probably a bus stop and a desk at Union Station?

Know the answer? Please comment.

See “Rails Around the Nation’s Capital”. A collection of articles about Railroads and Transit in and around Washington DC. Metro, Virginia Railway Express and Maryland DOT are covered. Also the Washington Terminal Railroad and other small railroads that were once a part of Washington.

Connecticut Trolley Museum Winterfest

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Live in Connecticut, Eastern New York State, or Western Massachusetts, you CANNOT miss this event at the Connecticut Trolley Museum

Join hundreds of others and start a family tradition of coming for a trolley ride during the holiday season.  Whether you ride a closed car or brave the cold to ride the open “electric sleigh”, we promise you a good time and one that you’ll remember for years.  Join your motormen in singing traditional Christmas carols as the trolley makes its way through the “Tunnel of Lights”.  Returning to the Visitor Center, it’s always a race to get into the warmth and enjoy a nice steaming cup of hot cocoa as you listen to the entertainment and admire all the model trains and displays.

Leave the hustle, bustle behind and enjoy the holidays as they were meant to be enjoyed!

Find out more, get times and directions.

 

Gino’s Rail Page, Blog and Trolleys…..Capital District, New York

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If you are interested in railroads or trolleys around the Capital District of New York State, or up into the Adirondacks, then you need to follow him. His BLOG just announced that the Saratoga and North Creek Railroad is purchasing the former Delaware & Hudson Palmer Branch in Corinth. (S&NC is the railroad that we follow because of their extension to Tahawus)

His Railroad Page  has lots of great sections, including the Troy & Schenectady Railroad.

He has a great trolley page too.

Gino has published a book on Capital District trolleys, and is a musician (who hasn’t quit his day job)

 

The Southern NY Railway

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The Southern New York Railway passed through Richfield Springs. This traffic signal controlled cars on historic Route 20 for many years.

In 1901 the promoters touted it as the Leatherstocking Route (alluding to James Fenimore Cooper‘s novel) and extended 25 miles northward to Cooperstown. Finally, in 1902 they extended the line to Richfield Springs (then known as Richfield Spa) and in 1904 to Mohawk. This created a 52-mile main line from Oneonta to the banks of the Mohawk River, and left Cooperstown on a three-mile branch from Index. For several years, the D&H had an injunction preventing the electric line from crossing the steam line at the west edge of Cooperstown. Passengers were obliged to walk across the railroad between connecting electric cars.

Although short on population, the Southern New York had connections with the Delaware & Hudson and the Ulster & Delaware at Oneonta; the Delaware Lackawanna & Western at Richfield Springs; and the New York State Railways and West Shore at Mohawk.

The company built a coal-fired steam plant at Hartwick to generate electricity. Because of the growing dependence on the profitability of power, the name of the company was changed in 1916 to Southern New York Power and Railway Company. The power business went on its own in 1926 and the line became Southern New York Railway. When the power business split off, though, so did the profits. The first casualty was Oneonta city trolley service. In 1922 there were five round trips a day between Oneonta and Mohawk. This was reduced to two by 1930 and then to one. The 1933 abandonment of the Utica and Mohawk Valley subsidiary of New York State Railways left the SNY without Herkimer access, a New York Central connection, and interurban box motor service to Utica. Passenger service was terminated and the line was cut north of the company-owned Jordanville quarry. Electric freight service lasted another seven years. The major justification for freight service was the quarry. When the quarry closed, the Southern New York then dropped back to a three-mile long diesel freight connector with the Delaware & Hudson at Oneonta.

Much of what is written about the Southern New York comes from several accounts of an October 20, 1938 fan trip.

Early into the excursion, a car ran into the trolley at an intersection. Damage was light, as the motorman quickly dumped the air. The car was owned by the mayor of Richfield Springs, who proclaimed, “There aren’t any trains on this railroad on Sunday!” He ended up joining the trip.

Also joining the trip at Index Junction was famed photographer Arthur J. “Putt” Telfer of Cooperstown. His pictures of the Southern New York portray the entire history of the line and are preserved in at least two museums, as well as in the collections of several postcard collectors. Telfer focused each print with his head beneath a black shroud over his old-fashioned (even by 1938 standards) camera with leather bellows.

The late Bob Gurley (from New Hartford, NY, where I lived once) was an acting motorman during the well-documented fantrip over the Southern New York.
See Gino’s Rail Blog for more stories.

Don’t miss the Connecticut Trolley Museum

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Welcome to our Unofficial Connecticut Trolley Museum WebSite

This old car shown above is now at the Connecticut Trolley Museum. Before going to Montréal, it worked in Springfield, Mass. Number 2056 is a steel lightweight built by Wason in 1927 and acquired in 1959.

There is a lot more to see at the museum than in the past. There are trolley movies. The adjacent Fire Museum is now included in your admission. Like always, you can ride the trolley all day.But don’t just read it here, see their WebSite then take a trip to the museum.

The Connecticut Trolley Museum invites you to take a journey back in time and experience the transportation of yesterday. The museum features a variety of streetcars from the 1890s to 1950s, many of which are available for rides. At the Connecticut Trolley Museum, we provide a historically accurate educational experience through the interpretation, preservation, restoration and operation of an electric railway.

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Come visit our exhibit in the Display Hall of the Visitor Center. It takes you on a journey of how the electric trolley evolved from the horsecar to the PCC. Also, learn how society was impacted by amusement parks (trolley parks), streetcar suburbs, and the growth of mill towns.

An Insider’s View of the Connecticut Trolley Museum

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The Connecticut Trolley Museum has over 70 pieces of rail equipment dating back to 1869. During your visit, you can see historic passenger and freight street “trolley” cars, interurban cars, elevated railway cars, passenger and freight railroad cars, service cars, locomotives, and a variety of other equipment from railways around Connecticut. You will also find examples from Brooklyn, Boston, New Orleans, Milwaukee, Cleveland, Springfield, Lynchburg, Montreal, and even Rio De Janeiro, Brazil.