Tag Archives: social network

An Iteration of the Hub – SuperHUB

Image

The most noticeable difference between VAN1 (the “traditional” VAN from the 1980’s) and VAN2 (today’s technology) is the fact that a company can operate their own network instead of being a customer on somebody else’s. Control the network according to your needs, Embed EDI Network functions within your code, and start creating completely unique EDI management functions that will overturn 20+ years of non-optimized EDI integration nightmares!

ECGrid is an example of VAN2. It supports AS2 and FTP and API, combined with superior account control, all at a fraction of the cost of running your own communications racks. It includes:

  • Intersystem interconnections via API calls and world class net ops.
  • Next generation routing architecture connecting to a world of global commerce networks.
  • VAN2 empowers cloud ventures to penetrate the SME sector – the next EDI frontier – with an estimated $30B of untapped IT revenue waiting to be captured.
  • These new B2B cloud services are the place to participate in supply chain and horizontal commerce operations. It allows you to run a “virtual VAN”.

Business Case for Enterprise Social Networks

Image

How do we justify a Social Supply Chain? Companies are not going to have any MORE Information than they have now, but they will use it differently/better because of what is happening with social technologies. Much of this information is beyond the four walls, but he wall between employees, vendors and customers is falling down. Thus highly socially networked companies that take advantage will find themselves in a more favorable position and see improvements over less networked companies. This means increased working capital, decreased inventories and better service levels.
The challenge in going “social” is to copy the real-world relationships found in today’s supply chains. Take a look at Facebook. Why did they succeed where others like MySpace did not? One thing that Facebook found is that a Facebook user’s social network better reflects real-life interactions. Facebook is successful because it crashes the barriers between people who have already demonstrated the desire to communicate with each other in the real world.