Tag Archives: Pinehurst

2014 US Open Day 4

ImageWell, Martin Kaymer did it: He beat Pinehurst and won the US Open Wall-to-Wall. Kaymer set the 36-hole scoring record by opening with a pair of 65s. He never let anyone closer than four shots over the final 48 holes. Equipped with a five-shot lead, he was the only player from the last eight groups to break par.

”You want to win majors in your career, but if you can win one more, it means so much more,” Kaymer said after closing with a 1-under 69 for an eight-shot victory over Rickie Fowler and two-time heart transplant recipient Erik Compton.

Only twice in the last 20 years of the U.S. Open has the 54-hole leader managed to break par in the final round. Then again, both were runaway winners. Rory McIlroy had an eight-shot lead at rain-softened Congressional in 2011 and closed with a 69. Tiger Woods had a 10-shot lead at Pebble Beach in 2000 and closed with a 67.

Kaymer returned to the elite in golf by turning the toughest test in golf into a runaway at Pinehurst No. 2, becoming only the seventh player to go wire-to-wire in the 114 years of the U.S. Open. Only three players finished the championship under par.

Martin’s 271 was good for $1,620,000;

Compton and Fowler got $789,330 each

Now for our picks:

Matt Kuchar Tied for 12th and got $156,679

Rory McIlroy Tied for 23rd and won $79,968

Graeme McDowell Tied for 28th but still won $59,588

Bubba Watson Didn’t even get a bus ticket home

 

US Open Day 3

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Martin Kaymer did not break par on a tough Day 3 at Pinehurst, but he did enough to retain a healthy lead.

After Saturday’s tough round at Pinehurst, Martin Kaymer admitted he didn’t have his best stuff. After matching 65s to open this U.S. Open, the first time in major history someone had shot those numbers in Rounds 1 and 2, Kaymer was struggling, both with the tougher conditions and his own golf swing.

After bogeys on the 13th and 15th, it looked like Kaymer’s lead could shrink to three or even two, but the German made great pars on 16 and 17 before sticking his approach shot on the 18th to 10 feet and knocking in the putt for the closing birdie.

Now for our picks:

Matt Kuchar Tied for 7th after shooting a 71

Rory McIlroy Tied for 16th after shooting 74

Graeme McDowell Tied for 42nd after shooting a 75 yesterday

Bubba Watson Probably went home

With a five-shot lead over Rickie Fowler and Erik Compton, it will be Kaymer’s to lose on Sunday. But if he plays another round like he did on Saturday, it will be Kaymer’s name on the trophy on Sunday evening.

As for the people chasing him going into Saturday’s third round, Rory McIlroy shot 74, Adam Scott and Jordan Spieth both shot disappointing 72s and Brendon Todd, who was paired with Kaymer in the third round, struggled all day on his way to a 9-over 79.

Rickie Fowler and Erik Compton both fired 3-under 67s, incredibly impressive considering the 73.8 scoring average on Saturday at the U.S. Open.

Fowler’s round was solid, making five birdies and two bogeys to get himself in the final group on Sunday with Kaymer.

Compton, playing in only his second major championship ever, got off to a hot start with two birdies and an eagle over his first eight holes, and while a bogey on the 16th dropped him back to 3-under, it was the birdie putt on the 18th he had to get in the final group at 4-under.

Pinehurst No. 2: The Way Golf Is Supposed To Be

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Pinehurst No. 2 is anything but perfect for the U.S. Open, at least in the traditional sense of major championships in America.

USGA executive director Mike Davis could not be any more thrilled. “It’s awesome,” Davis said Monday as he gazed out at a golf course that looks like a yard that hasn’t been watered in a month.

The US Open will NOT be played this year at one of those perfectly maintained “stadium courses” where the entire leaderboard is under par. This is a real TEST of golf. Sort of an inland version of those “links” courses that dot both sides of the Atlantic plus Peeble Beach on the West Coast.

Shortly after Pinehurst No. 2 was awarded its third U.S. Open in 15 years — the most for any golf course in more than a century — the USGA signed off on a project to restore the course to its natural look, with sandy areas of wiregrass bushes and natural vegetation where there once was gnarly rough. A U.S. Open without rough? That sounds as strange as a British Open without pot bunkers.

The USGA calls it “undergrowth”, Pinehurst Resort officials refer to it as “natural vegetation,” others call it weeds. The project required more than 35 acres of turf being removed, and only 450 of the 1,150 sprinkler heads remain.

Golf is getting used to not having Tiger Woods around. He hasn’t played in three months and already missed the Masters for the first time in his career. The notion of Phil Mickelson winning a U.S. Open at Pinehurst — any U.S. Open, for that matter — is more than enough to fill the void. However, seeing him at The Memorial last week, I think he is going after a tie with Sam Snead as a great “also ran” in US Open history.

Justin Rose is the defending champion, the latest player to have a chance to join Curtis Strange as the only back-to-back U.S. Open champions in the last 60 years. Bubba Watson, the Masters champion and No. 3 player in the world, is the only player capable of the calendar Grand Slam. The story lines haven’t changed much this year. Pinehurst, however, is still the main attraction for this U.S. Open.

The edges of the bunkers are ragged. The turf is uneven just off some of the greens, with patches of no grass. Instead of verdant fairways from tee-to-green, the fairways are a blend of green, yellow and brown.

The past two U.S. Open champons finished over par — Webb Simpson at Olympic Club, Justin Rose at Merion, both at 1-over. A third straight U.S. Open champion over par would be the longest streak in nearly 60 years.

 

What Golfer Will Win The US OPEN?

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Graeme McDowell Pinehurst #2 favors his golf game. This guy can only play well on REAL championship courses.

Matt Kuchar based on recent performance.

Bubba Watson the Master’s Champion, but not as consistant as Kuchar.

Rory McIlroy (except for those who insist that Tiger Woods will get off sick call or that Phil Mickelson will find a new putter or learn to use the one he has).

Yes the winner might come from some of the other great players. This is only one person’s picks, but who can really tell?

See all about the golf courses that have hosted the US Open.