Tag Archives: 2nd Avenue Subway

Second Avenue Subway Is At “Significant Risk” Of Missing December Opening

New, long-awaited subway stations along the MTA’s Second Avenue line are at risk of missing their promised December 2016 opening due to delays in critical equipment testing and the installation of communication systems, according to an independent engineer hired by the MTA to monitor the project’s progress.
“Looking at the schedule based on the project’s reports and our own field observations of the station construction program, we find that the project is not on schedule and has fallen further behind schedule in the month since our last report to you in June,” engineer Kent Haggas, who has been skeptical of the December deadline for months, told the MTA’s board on Monday.
Haggas added that the MTA needs to implement a “revised schedule” if it hopes to finish on time, a suggestion that MTA Chairman Tom Prendergast, presiding over Monday’s meeting, did not comment on.
The MTA did not respond to a request for comment on construction progress.
Haggas added that of a total 608 system tests scheduled through the end of June along the new line, only 336, or 55%, were completed by the end of last month.
Anil Parikh of the MTA’s Capital Construction Company also alluded to delays, but said he didn’t believe they would impact the December deadline. At the new 72nd Street, 86th Street, and 96th Street stations, he said, contractors are behind on installing communication systems because of “the incomplete conduit installation by the station contractors.” (Conduits being the tubes that protect electrical wiring.) In order to speed up the process, contractors are working double shifts.
“So let me get this straight,” said MTA Board member Mitchell Pally, after Parikh’s presentation. “The station contractor did not do his job.”
“That is correct,” Parikh said.
“As a result of that, we’ve told the systems contractor, who comes in after the station contractor, to do the job that the station contractor did not do,” Pally said. Parikh confirmed this.
At this point, Prendergast chimed in. “There’s no question about the competency of the systems contractor,” he said. “We’re just adding to his work. It’s the better [option]… if we’re all aimed at getting this done on time.”
The MTA has said that the Second Avenue line will serve a daily ridership of 200,000 New Yorkers, relieving congestion on the 4, 5, and 6 trains. The Q train will reroute along its length, necessitating the return of the W train to serve Astoria. The authority has also promised to fast-track further Second Avenue stations on up into East Harlem, at 106th, 116th, and 125th Street.New, long-awaited subway stations along the MTA’s Second Avenue line are at risk of missing their promised December 2016 opening due to delays in critical equipment testing and the installation of communication systems, according to an independent engineer hired by the MTA to monitor the project’s progress.
“Looking at the schedule based on the project’s reports and our own field observations of the station construction program, we find that the project is not on schedule and has fallen further behind schedule in the month since our last report to you in June,” engineer Kent Haggas, who has been skeptical of the December deadline for months, told the MTA’s board on Monday.
Haggas added that the MTA needs to implement a “revised schedule” if it hopes to finish on time, a suggestion that MTA Chairman Tom Prendergast, presiding over Monday’s meeting, did not comment on.
The MTA did not respond to a request for comment on construction progress.
Haggas added that of a total 608 system tests scheduled through the end of June along the new line, only 336, or 55%, were completed by the end of last month.
Anil Parikh of the MTA’s Capital Construction Company also alluded to delays, but said he didn’t believe they would impact the December deadline. At the new 72nd Street, 86th Street, and 96th Street stations, he said, contractors are behind on installing communication systems because of “the incomplete conduit installation by the station contractors.” (Conduits being the tubes that protect electrical wiring.) In order to speed up the process, contractors are working double shifts.
“So let me get this straight,” said MTA Board member Mitchell Pally, after Parikh’s presentation. “The station contractor did not do his job.”
“That is correct,” Parikh said.
“As a result of that, we’ve told the systems contractor, who comes in after the station contractor, to do the job that the station contractor did not do,” Pally said. Parikh confirmed this.
At this point, Prendergast chimed in. “There’s no question about the competency of the systems contractor,” he said. “We’re just adding to his work. It’s the better [option]… if we’re all aimed at getting this done on time.”
The MTA has said that the Second Avenue line will serve a daily ridership of 200,000 New Yorkers, relieving congestion on the 4, 5, and 6 trains. The Q train will reroute along its length, necessitating the return of the W train to serve Astoria. The authority has also promised to fast-track further Second Avenue stations on up into East Harlem, at 106th, 116th, and 125th Street.

EMMA WHITFORD IN NEWS Gothamist

An ‘A’ for Effort: Congresswoman Gives High Marks to Long-Delayed Second Avenue Subway Project

New Yorkers who’ve waited decades for a subway line on Second Avenue may not agree, but the long-running and nearly completed project is getting high marks from a Congresswoman who was vital in securing federal funds to build the line.

But Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney on Monday gave the MTA an A- grade for effort on a job the agency says is 94% completed.

“If they don’t meet the deadline, I’m going to give them an F,” Maloney said. “But I’m giving them an A-minus thinking they’re going to live up to their deadline!”

The MTA is racing to meet the end-of-year-goal, recently pouring another $66 million into the more than $4 billion project so contractors pick up the pace.

“This is too long, we’ve waited so long,” Maloney said.

However, residents and shopkeepers who long ago grew weary of having Second Avenue double as a construction zone may have to wait a little longer.

The MTA’s Independent Engineering Consultant last month said the project is at risk of not opening on time if contractors do not accelerate work on elevators and escalators at the 72nd Street station.

All the systems at the three new stations – as well at the existing Lexington Avenue-63rd Street stop – need to be in working order before Q trains can begin running to and from the Upper East Side.

And, in testing and making a “seamless transition” to the next phase to extend the line north to 125th Street, Maloney handed out C’s.

“They had planned that they would have 10 months of testing,” Maloney said. “They’re going to have roughly four to three months testing.”

That is making many along the route antsy, after they’ve already endured years of work.

“I get people at least a couple of times a week who say, ‘I’ve been here for 10-plus years and I didn’t even know you guys were still here,'” said Maurice Newkirk, a manager at Klausner Supply.

“People don’t really want to associate themselves with Second Avenue that much,” said Sammy Musovic, owner at Vero. “They know there’s too much going on, too much debris, construction.”

“They’re ambitious, in a word, at this point,” said one neighbor.

Now there are a little more than seven months to find out if the high marks stand.

Maloney says she’s optimistic that she won’t have to go back and change the final grade on a report that, for now, is written in pencil.

From her WebSite

2nd Phase of Second Avenue Subway Construction Delayed, Frustrating East Harlem Officials and Residents

Mayor Bill de Blasio is expressing dismay in a decision to delay construction on a new subway line.

The MTA announced that the second phase of the Second Ave. subway would be delayed beyond 2019.

The delay of that phase, which will stretch between 96th and 125th St. in Manhattan, outraged transit advocates and local officials. Construction on the second phase of the three East Harlem stations won’t start until 2020, despite assurances from de Blasio and Gov. Cuomo last week that it was on track.

Comptroller Scott Stringer said “promises have been broken,” as elected officials blasted the MTA for suddenly moving money out of the capital budget.

“This speaks so resoundingly of inequality,” said state Sen. Jose Serrano.

De Blasio on Thursday called for the delay and the MTA’s decision to cut $1 billion from its capital plan to be “reconsidered.” The mayor recently increased the city’s contribution to the MTA to a record $2.5 billion.

“Suddenly East Harlem gets cut out,” said state Sen. Liz Krueger. “It’s a bait and switch. I don’t even get it.”

A MTA spokesman said the phase was delayed because a tunnel boring machine wouldn’t be available. He added that time, not cash, is the real issue.

“If we had all the money in the world, we couldn’t have those tunnel boring machines moving by 2019,” said Adam Lisberg.

Meanwhile, those who live and work in East Harlem must continue their frustrating commutes.

“I walk to Lenox every day, back and forth 20 minutes,” said resident Alexa Laiacona.

“It would be helpful to have a station right here instead of walking two miles,” said Eric Barbosa.

The first phase of the Second Avenue subway, from 63rd St to 96th St, is slated to open next year.

Subway riders rip Andrew Cuomo for MTA funding by griping at cardboard replica of governor

The real Gov. Cuomo was nowhere to be found, so subway riders fumed at a cardboard replica instead.

 

The Cuomo cardboard cutout stopped at the Times Square subway station on Thursday to get a taste of the rush-hour traffic.
The Cuomo cardboard cutout stopped at the Times Square subway station on Thursday to get a taste of the rush-hour traffic.

Cuomo and state lawmakers left Albany this year without figuring out a way to plug the $14 billion hole in the MTA’s five-year plan to fix and replace aging equipment, boost the number of trains at rush hour and continue building the Second Avenue subway and other megaprojects.

New York City’s SECOND AVENUE SUBWAY (Part 3)

The highly anticipated Second Avenue Subway has hit another key milestone.The cavern for the 86th Street station was completed on time, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority announced Thursday.

Work on the $332 million station began back in 2011 and required extensive excavation as well as the creation of a huge concrete shell to encompass the station.“We have now completed 76% of the work needed to build Phase 1 of the Second Avenue Subway. This project will benefit residents of the Upper East Side in so many ways,” said Michael Horodniceanu, President, MTA Capital Construction.There’s still work to be done on the stations air supply, elevator and escalators, among other things.Phase I of the Second Avenue subway project, which includes stations at 72nd, 86th and 96th Streets is expected to serve 200,000 riders a day, relieving congestion on the Lexington Avenue line. It is expected to be completed in December 2016. It will function as an extension of the Q train.

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New York City’s SECOND AVENUE SUBWAY (Part 1)

New York City’s SECOND AVENUE SUBWAY (Part 2)

New York City’s SECOND AVENUE SUBWAY (Part 1)

The Metropolitan Transit Authority has released new photos of construction on the first phase of New York’s Second Avenue Subway, a more than $4 billion project that will run new tunnels between 63rd Street and 96th Street on the East side and is expected to be complete in 2016.

Although blasting and dust from the construction has ruffled the feathers of many Upper East Side residents, it looks like MTA workers are making some serious headway.

The entire line, which will be built in four phases, will run from 125th Street to the Financial District.

Arup Group
Arup Group
The twin-track line will include sixteen new underground stations
2ndAvenueSubway02
044 Second Ave subway se FINAL.inddIf you have Google Earth© installed on your computer, you can follow the path of this new subway

Second Avenue Subway from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority and MTA New York City Transit have begun the final planning and environmental analysis for a full-length Second Avenue Subway, from 125th Street to the Financial District in Lower Manhattan.

The Second Avenue Subway will reduce overcrowding and delays on the Lexington Avenue Line, improving travel for both city and suburban commuters, and improving access to mass transit for residents of the far East Side of Manhattan.

Project History

Subway Alignment

Station Locations

Project Update

Project Team

Documents & Presentations

In 1972, Governor Rockefeller and Mayor Lindsey broke ground for the Second Avenue Subway. Nearly 45 years later, no trains have ever run under Second Avenue.

The line has had at least three groundbreakings.

In 2007, it got another one.

Gov. Eliot Spitzer and a host of dignitaries will descend down a sidewalk hatch at 102nd Street, a block south of the spot where Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller and Mayor John V. Lindsay held a groundbreaking in October 1972. They will go into a never-used section of a three-decade old subway tunnel, stretching from 105th Street to 99th Street. The governor will give a speech, hoist a pickax and take a few cracks at the concrete wall, symbolically beginning the construction where it left off in the 1970s.

Several factors actually suggest that this time the outcome may be different. The financing for the $3.8 billion project appears more certain than in the past, including an anticipated federal commitment to cover about a third of the cost.

The goal of the first phase is to extend the Q line north from 57th Street to 63rd Street and Lexington Avenue. From there the Q will stop on Second Avenue at 72nd, 86th and 96th Streets. It is expected to become an integral part of the wider subway system when it is completed, which planners hope will be in 2013. Once further financing is secured, later phases of construction will extend the line north to 125th Street and south to Lower Manhattan.

It was September 1929 when the city formally announced plans to build the Second Avenue subway, extending the length of the East Side and into the Bronx. The cost of digging the Manhattan portion of the tunnel was estimated at $99 million, although there would be additional expenses, including the cost of real estate and equipment. But within a few years, amid the Great Depression, planning for the new line came to a halt.

The plans were revived during World War II. In 1951, voters approved a measure that allowed the city to raise $500 million for transit improvements, with the expectation that most of it would go to build the new line. But the money was used to fix up the existing system. No work was performed on Second Avenue.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority took over the city’s subway system in 1968 and began championing an ambitious range of projects, including the Second Avenue subway, from Whitehall Street to 138th Street in the Bronx.

In July 1974, Mayor Abraham D. Beame attended a groundbreaking at Second Avenue and Second Street. He went at the pavement with a jackhammer. The plan was to build the subway piecemeal, contracting out short, disconnected sections.

A year later the city was near bankruptcy; Mayor Beame called a halt to further construction. The stretch of tunnel he broke ground on was never built, although three other sections were finished and sealed.

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New York City’s SECOND AVENUE SUBWAY (Part 2)

New York City’s SECOND AVENUE SUBWAY (Part 3)