TLP Living: 4/16/18

TLP

Working for the Railroad

Happy Monday to you from the Heartland of America. I thought I’d share a little story with you today about two best friends…

Jack and Tom were best friends all through school. They played ball together, had adventures together… they were inseparable. When the day came for their graduation from high school, they both went to the railroad office near the place where they lived and filled out job applications. A few days later they were both interviewed and hired, and the following Monday they reported together for their first day of work.

Yes, Jack and Tom were the best of friends.

As time went by, both of the boys married their high school sweethearts and began families, and for some time they remained close friends. One day however, Tom was promoted to a new job in another town, and they saw less and less of…

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Forget that trolley plan

PenneyVanderbilt

Queens Chronical

Western Queens Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer probably summed up the status of Mayor de Blasio’s waterfront streetcar plan as best as anyone could when he told us on Tuesday, “I personally thought this was dead already.”

In the news pages, we’re reporting that the mayor now admits the Brooklyn Queens Connector, or BQX, cannot be built without federal aid, contrary to what its supporters have been saying for the last two years. That there’s still no sign of the feasibility study on the project, first supposed to be produced by early 2017 at the latest. That the city is stonewalling Freedom of Information Act requests from a group opposing the plan for documents related to it. And that it’s no longer answering our questions about the project [see story in some editions or at qchron.com].

Here in the opinion pages, we can just say the plan is dead…

View original post 186 more words

Forget that trolley plan

Queens Chronical

Western Queens Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer probably summed up the status of Mayor de Blasio’s waterfront streetcar plan as best as anyone could when he told us on Tuesday, “I personally thought this was dead already.”

In the news pages, we’re reporting that the mayor now admits the Brooklyn Queens Connector, or BQX, cannot be built without federal aid, contrary to what its supporters have been saying for the last two years. That there’s still no sign of the feasibility study on the project, first supposed to be produced by early 2017 at the latest. That the city is stonewalling Freedom of Information Act requests from a group opposing the plan for documents related to it. And that it’s no longer answering our questions about the project [see story in some editions or at qchron.com].

Here in the opinion pages, we can just say the plan is dead. It was a nice idea — a 16-mile trolley route connecting Queens and Brooklyn — and maybe it can happen decades from now, but today it’s a pipe dream.

Mainly, the money for it isn’t there. There won’t be any federal aid for a toy train under de Blasio’s Christmas tree when far more important projects like the Second Avenue Subway, East Side Access for the Long Island Rail Road and the hoped-for Gateway Tunnel under the Hudson River are jockeying for funds. And don’t expect a dime from the state.

How much money would be needed is, of course, unknown. The project’s backers have repeatedly told us, for example, that it would cost $2.5 billion regardless of whether a new bridge would have to be built over Newtown Creek. That just shows it’s not a serious plan.

And when the Daily News reported that a deputy mayor said it might not be built if it needs outside funding, the mayor criticized the paper’s reporting rather than address it.

RIP, BQX. You were so sleek and modern, you were ahead of your time. Maybe one day.

Where Elon Musk’s Hyperloop could go in NYC — if it ever happens

Penney Vanderbilt and KC Jones: All About Railroads

The Real Deal

For most, the idea of traffic-less, headache-free travel is nothing but a pipe dream. For Elon Musk, it could be the future of mass transit.

Last summer, the tech mogul tweeted that he received “verbal govt approval” for his fabeled Hyperloop, a high-speed transportation system that would send passengers sailing through low-pressure tubes at speeds in excess of 700 miles per hour.

Though some developers doubt the project will ever happen, The Real Deal sought out five vacant lots where Hyperloop stations could go if it ever comes to New York City. The sites are based largely on their proximity to existing transportation, population hubs and similarities to the lot in D.C. where Musk received an actual permit to do some excavation work.

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