A LIMERICK’S PLAY ON WORDS**

By the Mighty Mumford

LIMERICKS play on words,

For fun-but some it disturbs…

When it says “to sit down”

Check the context around,

Probably there are clues to unearth!

When the last mentions “sit down”–WHY?

Is the speaker no longer spry…?

Another interpretation

Is there WAS a CONVERSATION,

Earlier on, to eye!

In many places people sit down,

to talk and hang around…

In this case–YES–

That interpretation’s best!–

He didn’t want to put all that down (in writing!).-

THE REASON WHY–involves limerick rules,

Rhythm and word count make useful tools…

Wanted word count for that last line

the same as the first (with which it rhymed)–

although he could have dragged the last line as long as he needed or wanted to—(take a deep breath)—-he didn’t want to lose conciseness of his jewels!

So  Ya got it?’Any questions about Limericks in the English language–which is not always a language…

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ECONOMIC CHOICES IN MINIATURE

By the Mighty Mumford

“N” scale, like the prototype–

You have to go beyond hype…

What can be afforded

with supplies hoarded,

And not on useless dream tripe!

He gave up his engine turn table

Because he wasn’t able

Budget-wise

To realize

Replace a switch disabled!

Too many soldering iron passes,

Melted plastic where metal would have lasted…

Its replace too long

and angled wrong,

For the turn table pit–it passed it!

A switch costs near twenty dollars,

N scale isn’t cheap–he hollers!

Left to make do

With what he HAS TO,

The stone engine house must cover

(the turntable pit–literally!).

Which–in a way–is BETTER,

More room left for a river…

The river’s uncrossed–

That connection’s “lost”–

I sound like a “pale-faced giver”!

–Jonathan Caswell

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Soup, soup and soup please.

Windows into History

Boulevard des Italiens in Paris at night, by Eugene Lami.

Snippets 147.  On October 22nd 1881 the first ever issue of Tit-Bits was published, with a simple aim of extracting all the best quotes from other newspapers, magazines and books.  It was successful enough to run for over a hundred years, until 1984.  The following amusing quote is from the very first issue:

An Englishman in Paris went into a restaurant to get his dinner.  Unacquainted with the French language, yet unwilling to show his ignorance, he pointed to the first line on the bill of fare, and the polite waiter brought him a plate of thin soup.  This was very well, and when it was despatched he pointed to the second line.  The waiter understood him perfectly, and brought him a vegetable soup.  “Rather more soup than I want,” thought he; “but it is a Paris fashion.”  He…

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FOLLOW UP – ROBERT MITCHUM ON THE EASTERN SHORE

easternshorebrent

mitchum (3)Courtesy: Weird Hollywood

Readers seemed to like the recent story about Robert Mitchum on the Eastern Shore.

Many wanted to share their own memories of encounters with the iconic tough guy movie star, while others had questions.

It was brought to easternshorebrent.com ‘s attention that the reason given for the Mitchum’s move to the Eastern Shore seemed more from the perspective of a wife who’s husband was almost as famous for his affairs as he was his image and acting. The question was: what reason did Robert Mitchum give for choosing to live on the shore.

00 followup

From the biography, Baby, I Don’t Care by Lee Server, Mitchum explained thusly:

“I asked this real estater what the natives did in these parts. He said, ‘We don’t do nothing but go crabbing and drink.’ I knew he was telling the truth because right after he said that he fell on his ear…

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