The Ableism of Internet Map Directions

Great thoughts!

Blind Injustice

For most of us, it is easy to get transit directions to get from Point A to Point B. You just go onto Google Maps (or maybe Bing or Yahoo Maps), type your starting point, type your destination point, and get directions from there. It seems simple enough.

Simple enough for able-bodied people.

If you are wheelchair-bound, or told by your doctor or your own body to try avoiding stairs, obtaining directions are not that simple for one reason—to my knowledge, not a single internet map provider gives people an opportunity to select wheelchair-friendly directions.

The problem is especially noticeable in my hometown of New York City, where the subway system is so unfriendly to wheelchairs that it is in the midst of lawsuits right now. Given the lack of wheelchair access with the subways in New York, and with transit in many parts of the world, there is a…

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Brooklyn Startup Creates Personal Countdown Clocks For MTA Riders

Do not have a contact to buy. Contact WCBS in New York

PenneyVanderbilt

NewYork CBSLOCAL

A Brooklyn startup is selling what it thinks is the perfect Christmas gift for Metropolitan Transportation Authority riders: personal countdown clocks.

You’ve been there – you race to the train and if you’re lucky, a digital display tells you how long you’ll have to wait.

The NYC Train Sign is like a home edition that you can fit on your bookshelf, WCBS 880’s Ethan Harp reported.

“This is a slimmed down, commercial version for bars, restaurants and homes,” said founder Timothy Woo, who built one for his Bushwick apartment.

Models start at $300 and come wrapped in wood, metal or plastic.

“Some people want them for home décor, as art or novelty items. Some people buy it for sheer practical reasons,” Woo said. “They live very close to the subway and actually want to look up at the clock and know when to run out the door.”

With…

View original post 91 more words

Brooklyn Startup Creates Personal Countdown Clocks For MTA Riders

NewYork CBSLOCAL

A Brooklyn startup is selling what it thinks is the perfect Christmas gift for Metropolitan Transportation Authority riders: personal countdown clocks.

You’ve been there – you race to the train and if you’re lucky, a digital display tells you how long you’ll have to wait.

The NYC Train Sign is like a home edition that you can fit on your bookshelf, WCBS 880’s Ethan Harp reported.

“This is a slimmed down, commercial version for bars, restaurants and homes,” said founder Timothy Woo, who built one for his Bushwick apartment.

Models start at $300 and come wrapped in wood, metal or plastic.

“Some people want them for home décor, as art or novelty items. Some people buy it for sheer practical reasons,” Woo said. “They live very close to the subway and actually want to look up at the clock and know when to run out the door.”

With internet, you can track most New York City subway, Metro-North, LIRR and PATH trains in real time, along with buses.

“It’s posted in my window as a public service. So it’s pretty cool. In the morning, you’ll see a small group of people as the train’s coming out in front of my house,” said Woo.

What does the MTA think of this?

“They haven’t responded to us directly, but I’m sure they have a lot of other things to worry about,” he said.

clocks

This is the MTA verson of countdown clock

Elon Musk wants to start digging in Los Angeles

Bizjournals Orlando

Elon Musk’s idea for The Boring Co. is less than a year old, but he’s ready to start digging a tunnel under Los Angeles.

The man who leads SpaceX and Tesla (Nasdaq: TSLA) applied for approval from L.A. officials to start burrowing along the 405 freeway, reported the Los Angeles Times.

The privately funded project would start near Hawthorne, Calif. — where SpaceX is headquartered and where The Boring Co. already has started digging — and parallel the 405 north toward Westwood. The route would include “a number of stops along the way,” a company spokesperson said.

Musk first started digging in an old SpaceX parking lot in Hawthorne, and in August got permission from the city to extend the tunnel past the property line.

Last month, he shared a photo of the project’s progress, saying that The Boring Co. has dug 500 feet so far, and the tunnel should reach two miles in three or four months, with the goal of paralleling the 405 freeway from Los Angeles International Airport to the 101 “in a year or so.”

However, that seems an unlikely timeline with requirements such as city approvals of the nascent technology, permits and environmental reviews. Councilman Mike Bonin invited Boring to present at the city council next year, the Times said.

Meanwhile, Los Angeles County already has a plan to build a $5 billion tunnel through the Sepulveda Pass, also along the 405.

Back in Hawthorne, The Boring Co. has permission to dig a two-mile underground test track extending west from the SpaceX headquarters under the northeast corner of the local airport and along 120th Street.

Such a system would reduce a trip from Westwood to the airport to five minutes, Musk has speculated.

In addition, the company got permission to start digging a similar tunnel on the other side of the country. The state of Maryland issued a conditional utility permit to tunnel 10.3 miles under part of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway.

That dig is just the first step toward an underground hyperloop that would connect New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington, D.C. — an idea Musk proposed on Twitter over the summer. The trip would take just 29 minutes.

A Florida Hyperloop One route has been talked about. The proposed 257-mile Florida route would be a speedy 26-minute trip, and would call for connections at the Dolphin Mall in Miami and Orlando’s Walt Disney World Resort, as Orlando Business Journal previously reported.

Musk has released a steady stream of renderings of the Hyperloop One project, including how the system would work, what it would look like to ride through the tunnels and what passenger vehicles would look like.

SO WHAT HAPPENED TO GENERAL ELECTRIC? PART 8 (YEARS 2010-2012)

Special Guest Blog By Ken Kinlock


Shale Gas Revolution
To make compressed natural gas (CNG) more accessible as a transportation fuel, GE Oil & Gas and Chesapeake Energy created a compact refueling solution, the CNG In A Box™ system. The benefits are impressive: For every fleet vehicle filled with CNG instead of gasoline, carbon dioxide emissions equivalents are reduced about 24%.

GE_AR12 Dividend History

Summary of Operating Segments

General Electric Company and consolidated affiliates
(In millions) 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008
REVENUES (a)
Power & Water $ 28,299 $ 25,675 $ 24,779 $ 27,389 $ 28,537
Oil & Gas 15,241 13,608 9,433 9,683 9,886
Energy Management 7,412 6,422 5,161 5,223 6,427
Aviation 19,994 18,859 17,619 18,728 19,239
Healthcare 18,290 18,083 16,897 16,015 17,392
Transportation 5,608 4,885 3,370 3,827 5,016
Home & Business
Solutions 7,967 7,693 7,957 7,816 9,304
Total industrial
segment revenues 102,811 95,225 85,216 88,681 95,801
GE Capital 46,039 49,068 49,856 51,776 68,541
Total segment
revenues 148,850 144,293 135,072 140,457 164,342
Corporate items
and eliminations (b)(1,491) 2,995 14,495 13,939 15,427
CONSOLIDATED
REVENUES $147,359 $147,288 $149,567 $154,396 $179,769

SEGMENT PROFIT
Power & Water $ 5,422 $ 5,021 $ 5,804 $ 5,592 $ 4,563
Oil & Gas 1,924 1,660 1,406 1,440 1,555
Energy Management 131 78 156 144 478
Aviation 3,747 3,512 3,304 3,923 3,684
Healthcare 2,920 2,803 2,741 2,420 2,851
Transportation 1,031 757 315 473 962
Home & Business
Solutions 311 237 404 360 287
Total industrial
segment profit 15,486 14,068 14,130 14,352 14,380
GE Capital 7,401 6,584 3,120 1,253 7,470
Total
segment profit 22,887 20,652 17,250 15,605 21,850
Corporate items and
eliminations (b) (4,842) (287) (1,013) (507) 1,516
GE interest
and other financial
charges (1,353) (1,299) (1,600) (1,478) (2,153)
GE provision for
income taxes (2,013) (4,839) (2,024) (2,739) (3,427)
Earnings from continuing operations attributable
to the Company 14,679 14,227 12,613 10,881 17,786
Earnings (loss) from discontinued operations,
net of taxes (1,038) (76) (969) 144 (376)
CONSOLIDATED NET EARNINGS ATTRIBUTABLE
TO THE COMPANY $ 13,641 $ 14,151 $ 11,644 $ 11,025 $ 17,410

POWER & WATER revenues of $28.3 billion increased $2.6 billion, or
10%, in 2012 as higher volume ($3.4 billion), driven by an increase
in sales of equipment at Wind, and an increase in other income
($0.2 billion) were partially offset by the effects of the stronger
U.S. dollar ($0.6 billion) and lower prices ($0.4 billion).
Segment profit of $5.4 billion increased $0.4 billion, or 8%,
in 2012 as higher volume ($0.7 billion), increased other income
($0.2 billion) and the impacts of deflation ($0.1 billion), were
partially offset by lower prices ($0.4 billion), lower productivity
($0.1 billion) and the effects of the stronger U.S. dollar
($0.1 billion).
Power & Water revenues of $25.7 billion increased $0.9 billion
(including $0.3 billion from acquisitions), or 4%, in 2011 as higher
volume ($0.9 billion) and the effects of the weaker U.S. dollar
($0.4 billion) were partially offset by lower prices ($0.5 billion).
Segment profit of $5.0 billion decreased $0.8 billion, or 13%, in
2011 as lower productivity ($0.7 billion), and lower prices ($0.5 billion), driven primarily by Wind, were partially offset by higher
volume ($0.2 billion) and the effects of deflation ($0.1 billion).
Power & Water segment orders decreased 10% to $24.2 billion
in 2012. Total Power & Water backlog increased 1% to $58.8 billion
at December 31, 2012, composed of equipment backlog of
$8.6 billion and services backlog of $50.2 billion. Comparable
December 31, 2011 equipment and service order backlogs
were $12.0 billion and $45.9 billion, respectively. See Corporate
Items and Eliminations for a discussion of items not allocated to
this segment.

OIL & GAS revenues of $15.2 billion increased $1.6 billion (including
$0.7 billion from acquisitions), or 12%, in 2012 as higher
volume ($2.3 billion) driven by acquisitions and an increase in
sales of both equipment and services was partially offset by the
effects of the stronger U.S. dollar ($0.7 billion).
Segment profit of $1.9 billion increased $0.3 billion, or 16%, in
2012 as higher volume ($0.3 billion) and increased productivity
($0.1 billion), reflecting increased equipment margins, were partially
offset by the effects of the stronger U.S. dollar ($0.1 billion).
Oil & Gas revenues of $13.6 billion increased $4.2 billion
(including $2.9 billion from acquisitions), or 44%, in 2011 as higher
volume ($3.8 billion) and the effects of the weaker U.S. dollar
($0.4 billion) were partially offset by lower prices ($0.1 billion).
Segment profit of $1.7 billion increased $0.3 billion, or 18%,
in 2011 as higher volume ($0.6 billion) was partially offset by
lower productivity ($0.3 billion) and lower prices ($0.1 billion).
Oil & Gas segment orders increased 16% to $18.2 billion
in 2012. Total Oil & Gas backlog increased 24% to $14.8 billion
at December 31, 2012, composed of equipment backlog of
$10.2 billion and services backlog of $4.5 billion. Comparable
December 31, 2011 equipment and service order backlogs
were $8.5 billion and $3.5 billion, respectively. See Corporate
Items and Eliminations for a discussion of items not allocated to
this segment.

ENERGY MANAGEMENT revenues of $7.4 billion increased $1.0 billion
(including $1.0 billion from acquisitions), or 15%, in 2012 as
higher volume ($1.1 billion) primarily driven by acquisitions, higher
prices ($0.1 billion) and increased other income ($0.1 billion)
were partially offset by the effects of the stronger U.S. dollar
($0.2 billion).
Segment profit of $0.1 billion increased $0.1 billion, or 68%, in
2012 as a result of higher prices ($0.1 billion) and increased other
income ($0.1 billion).
Energy Management revenues of $6.4 billion increased $1.3 billion
(including $0.8 billion from acquisitions), or 24%, in 2011 as
higher volume ($1.2 billion), mainly driven by acquisitions, the effects
of the weaker U.S. dollar ($0.1 billion) and higher prices ($0.1 billion)
were partially offset by decreased other income ($0.1 billion).
Segment profit of $0.1 billion decreased $0.1 billion, or 50%,
in 2011 as the effects of inflation ($0.1 billion) and decreased
other income ($0.1 billion) were partially offset by higher prices
($0.1 billion).
Energy Management segment orders increased 16% to
$7.9 billion in 2012. Total Energy Management backlog increased
6% to $3.8 billion at December 31, 2012, composed of equipment
backlog of $3.2 billion and services backlog of $0.6 billion.
Comparable December 31, 2011 equipment and service order
backlogs were $2.8 billion and $0.8 billion, respectively. See
Corporate Items and Eliminations for a discussion of items not
allocated to this segment.

AVIATION revenues of $20.0 billion increased $1.1 billion, or 6%, in
2012 due primarily to higher prices ($0.8 billion) and higher volume
($0.4 billion), which were driven by increased commercial
and military engine sales.
Segment profit of $3.7 billion increased $0.2 billion, or 7%, in
2012 due primarily to higher prices ($0.8 billion) and higher volume
($0.1 billion), partially offset by higher inflation ($0.3 billion)
and lower productivity ($0.3 billion).
Aviation revenues of $18.9 billion increased $1.2 billion, or
7%, in 2011 due primarily to higher volume ($1.1 billion) and
higher prices ($0.2 billion), partially offset by lower other income
($0.1 billion). Higher volume and higher prices were driven by
increased services ($0.9 billion) and equipment sales ($0.4 billion).
The increase in services revenue was primarily due to higher
commercial spares sales while the increase in equipment revenue
was primarily due to commercial engines.
Segment profit of $3.5 billion increased $0.2 billion, or 6%,
in 2011 due primarily to higher volume ($0.2 billion) and higher
prices ($0.2 billion), partially offset by higher inflation, primarily
non-material related ($0.1 billion), and lower other income
($0.1 billion). Incremental research and development and GEnx
product launch costs offset higher productivity.
Aviation equipment orders increased 8% to $13.0 billion
in 2012. Total Aviation backlog increased 3% to $102.4 billion
at December 31, 2012, composed of equipment backlog of
$22.9 billion and services backlog of $79.5 billion. Comparable
December 31, 2011 equipment and service order backlogs
were $22.5 billion and $76.5 billion, respectively. See Corporate
Items and Eliminations for a discussion of items not allocated to
this segment.

HEALTHCARE revenues of $18.3 billion increased $0.2 billion, or
1%, in 2012 due to higher volume ($0.8 billion) and other income
($0.1 billion), partially offset by the stronger U.S. dollar ($0.4 billion) and lower prices ($0.3 billion). The revenue increase, driven
by higher equipment sales, is attributable to international markets,
with the strongest growth in emerging markets.
Segment profit of $2.9 billion increased $0.1 billion, or 4%, in
2012 reflecting increased productivity ($0.4 billion), higher volume
($0.1 billion) and other income ($0.1 billion), partially offset by
lower prices ($0.3 billion) and higher inflation ($0.2 billion), primarily non-material related.
Healthcare revenues of $18.1 billion increased $1.2 billion, or
7%, in 2011 due to higher volume ($1.0 billion) and the weaker
U.S. dollar ($0.4 billion), partially offset by lower prices ($0.3 billion).
The revenue increase was split between equipment sales
($0.7 billion) and services ($0.5 billion). Revenue increased in the
U.S. and international markets, with the strongest growth in
emerging markets.
Segment profit of $2.8 billion increased 2%, or $0.1 billion, in
2011 reflecting increased productivity ($0.3 billion), higher volume
($0.2 billion) and the weaker U.S. dollar ($0.1 billion), partially
offset by lower prices ($0.3 billion) and higher inflation ($0.1 billion),primarily non-material related.

Healthcare equipment orders increased 5% to $11.1 billion
in 2012. Total Healthcare backlog increased 15% to $15.4 billion
at December 31, 2012, composed of equipment backlog of
$4.5 billion and services backlog of $10.9 billion. Comparable
December 31, 2011 equipment and service order backlogs
were $3.9 billion and $9.6 billion, respectively. See Corporate
Items and Eliminations for a discussion of items not allocated to
this segment.

TRANSPORTATION revenues of $5.6 billion increased $0.7 billion, or
15%, in 2012 due to higher volume ($0.6 billion) and higher prices
($0.1 billion). The revenue increase was split between equipment
sales ($0.4 billion) and services ($0.3 billion). The increase in
equipment revenue was primarily driven by an increase in U.S.
locomotive sales and growth in our global mining equipment
business. The increase in service revenue was due to higher
overhauls and increased service productivity.
Segment profit of $1.0 billion increased $0.3 billion, or 36%,
in 2012 as a result of higher volume ($0.1 billion), higher prices
($0.1 billion) and increased productivity ($0.1 billion), reflecting
improved service margins.
Transportation revenues of $4.9 billion increased $1.5 billion,
or 45%, in 2011 due to higher volume ($1.5 billion) related
to increased equipment sales ($0.9 billion) and services ($0.6 billion).
The increase in equipment revenue was primarily driven
by an increase in U.S. and international locomotive sales and
growth in our global mining equipment business. The increase
in service revenue was due to higher overhauls and increased
service productivity.
Segment profit of $0.8 billion increased $0.4 billion, or over
100%, in 2011 as a result of increased productivity ($0.4 billion),
reflecting improved service margins, and higher volume ($0.1 billion),
partially offset by higher inflation ($0.1 billion).
Transportation equipment orders increased 35% to $3.0 billion
in 2012. Total Transportation backlog decreased 5% to $14.4 billion
at December 31, 2012, composed of equipment backlog of
$3.3 billion and services.

AVIATION revenues of $20.0 billion increased $1.1 billion, or 6%, in
2012 due primarily to higher prices ($0.8 billion) and higher volume
($0.4 billion), which were driven by increased commercial
and military engine sales.
Segment profit of $3.7 billion increased $0.2 billion, or 7%, in
2012 due primarily to higher prices ($0.8 billion) and higher volume
($0.1 billion), partially offset by higher inflation ($0.3 billion)
and lower productivity ($0.3 billion).
Aviation revenues of $18.9 billion increased $1.2 billion, or
7%, in 2011 due primarily to higher volume ($1.1 billion) and
higher prices ($0.2 billion), partially offset by lower other income
($0.1 billion). Higher volume and higher prices were driven by
increased services ($0.9 billion) and equipment sales ($0.4 billion).
The increase in services revenue was primarily due to higher
commercial spares sales while the increase in equipment revenue
was primarily due to commercial engines.
Segment profit of $3.5 billion increased $0.2 billion, or 6%,
in 2011 due primarily to higher volume ($0.2 billion) and higher
prices ($0.2 billion), partially offset by higher inflation, primarily
non-material related ($0.1 billion), and lower other income
($0.1 billion). Incremental research and development and GEnx
product launch costs offset higher productivity.
Aviation equipment orders increased 8% to $13.0 billion
in 2012. Total Aviation backlog increased 3% to $102.4 billion
at December 31, 2012, composed of equipment backlog of
$22.9 billion and services backlog of $79.5 billion. Comparable
December 31, 2011 equipment and service order backlogs
were $22.5 billion and $76.5 billion, respectively. See Corporate
Items and Eliminations for a discussion of items not allocated to
this segment.
management’s discussion and analysis

HEALTHCARE revenues of $18.3 billion increased $0.2 billion, or
1%, in 2012 due to higher volume ($0.8 billion) and other income
($0.1 billion), partially offset by the stronger U.S. dollar ($0.4 billion)
and lower prices ($0.3 billion). The revenue increase, driven
by higher equipment sales, is attributable to international markets,
with the strongest growth in emerging markets.
Segment profit of $2.9 billion increased $0.1 billion, or 4%, in
2012 reflecting increased productivity ($0.4 billion), higher volume
($0.1 billion) and other income ($0.1 billion), partially offset by
lower prices ($0.3 billion) and higher inflation ($0.2 billion), primarily
non-material related.
Healthcare revenues of $18.1 billion increased $1.2 billion, or
7%, in 2011 due to higher volume ($1.0 billion) and the weaker
U.S. dollar ($0.4 billion), partially offset by lower prices ($0.3 billion).
The revenue increase was split between equipment sales
($0.7 billion) and services ($0.5 billion). Revenue increased in the
U.S. and international markets, with the strongest growth in
emerging markets.
Segment profit of $2.8 billion increased 2%, or $0.1 billion, in
2011 reflecting increased productivity ($0.3 billion), higher volume
($0.2 billion) and the weaker U.S. dollar ($0.1 billion), partially
offset by lower prices ($0.3 billion) and higher inflation ($0.1 billion),
primarily non-material related.
Healthcare equipment orders increased 5% to $11.1 billion
in 2012. Total Healthcare backlog increased 15% to $15.4 billion
at December 31, 2012, composed of equipment backlog of
$4.5 billion and services backlog of $10.9 billion. Comparable
December 31, 2011 equipment and service order backlogs
were $3.9 billion and $9.6 billion, respectively. See Corporate
Items and Eliminations for a discussion of items not allocated to
this segment.
TRANSPORTATION revenues of $5.6 billion increased $0.7 billion, or
15%, in 2012 due to higher volume ($0.6 billion) and higher prices
($0.1 billion). The revenue increase was split between equipment
sales ($0.4 billion) and services ($0.3 billion). The increase in
equipment revenue was primarily driven by an increase in U.S.
locomotive sales and growth in our global mining equipment
business. The increase in service revenue was due to higher
overhauls and increased service productivity.
Segment profit of $1.0 billion increased $0.3 billion, or 36%,
in 2012 as a result of higher volume ($0.1 billion), higher prices
($0.1 billion) and increased productivity ($0.1 billion), reflecting
improved service margins.
Transportation revenues of $4.9 billion increased $1.5 billion,
or 45%, in 2011 due to higher volume ($1.5 billion) related
to increased equipment sales ($0.9 billion) and services ($0.6 billion).
The increase in equipment revenue was primarily driven
by an increase in U.S. and international locomotive sales and
growth in our global mining equipment business. The increase
in service revenue was due to higher overhauls and increased
service productivity.
Segment profit of $0.8 billion increased $0.4 billion, or over
100%, in 2011 as a result of increased productivity ($0.4 billion),
reflecting improved service margins, and higher volume ($0.1 billion),
partially offset by higher inflation ($0.1 billion).
Transportation equipment orders increased 35% to $3.0 billion
in 2012. Total Transportation backlog decreased 5% to $14.4 billion
at December 31, 2012, composed of equipment backlog of
$3.3 billion and services.

Home & Business Solutions revenues of $7.7 billion decreased
$0.3 billion, or 3%, in 2011 reflecting a decrease at Appliances
partially offset by higher revenues at Lighting. Overall, revenues
decreased primarily as a result of lower volume ($0.4 billion) principally
at Appliances, partially offset by the weaker U.S. dollar
($0.1 billion) and higher prices.
Segment profit of $0.2 billion decreased 41%, or $0.2 billion,
in 2011 as the effects of inflation ($0.3 billion) were partially offset
by the effects of the weaker U.S. dollar, increased productivity
and higher prices. See Corporate Items and Elimination for a discussion
of items not allocated to this segment.

Geographic Operations
Our global activities span all geographic regions and primarily
encompass manufacturing for local and export markets, import
and sale of products produced in other regions, leasing of aircraft,
sourcing for our plants domiciled in other global regions
and provision of financial services within these regional economies.
Thus, when countries or regions experience currency and/
or economic stress, we often have increased exposure to certain
risks, but also often have new opportunities that include, among
other things, more opportunities for expansion of industrial and
financial services activities through purchases of companies or
assets at reduced prices and lower U.S. debt financing costs.

Revenues are classified according to the region to which products
and services are sold. For purposes of this analysis, the U.S.
is presented separately from the remainder of the Americas.
GEOGRAPHIC REVENUES
(In billions) 2012 2011 2010
U.S. $ 70.4 $ 69.8 $ 75.1
Europe 27.4 29.0 30.9
Pacific Basin 24.5 23.2 20.8
Americas 13.2 13.3 11.7
Middle East and Africa 11.9 12.0 11.1
Total $147.4 $147.3 $149.6
Global revenues were $76.9 billion in 2012, compared with
$77.5 billion and $74.5 billion in 2011 and 2010, respectively. Global
revenues to external customers as a percentage of consolidated
revenues were 52% in 2012, compared with 53% in 2011 and 50%
in 2010. The effects of currency fluctuations on reported results
decreased revenues by $2.6 billion in 2012 and increased revenues
by $2.5 billion and $0.5 billion in 2011 and 2010, respectively.

Global revenues were $76.9 billion in 2012, compared with
$77.5 billion and $74.5 billion in 2011 and 2010, respectively. Global
revenues to external customers as a percentage of consolidated
revenues were 52% in 2012, compared with 53% in 2011 and 50%
in 2010. The effects of currency fluctuations on reported results
decreased revenues by $2.6 billion in 2012 and increased revenues
by $2.5 billion and $0.5 billion in 2011 and 2010, respectively.
GE global revenues, excluding GECC, in 2012 were $57.3 billion,
up 5% over 2011. Increases in growth markets of 20% in
China, 22% in Australia and New Zealand and 8% in Latin America
more than offset a decrease of 36% in India. These revenues as
a percentage of GE total revenues, excluding GECC, were 57%
in 2012, compared with 55% and 50% in 2011 and 2010, respectively.
GE global revenues, excluding GECC, were $54.3 billion in
2011, up 9% from 2010, primarily resulting from increases in Latin
America, China and Australia and New Zealand, partially offset by
a decrease in Europe.
GECC global revenues decreased 15% to $19.7 billion in 2012,
compared with $23.2 billion and $24.7 billion in 2011 and 2010,
respectively, primarily as a result of decreases in Europe. GECC
global revenues as a percentage of total GECC revenues were
43% in 2012, compared with 47% and 50% in 2011 and 2010,
respectively. GECC global revenue decreased by 6% in 2011 from
$24.7 billion in 2010, primarily as a result of decreases in Europe.
TOTAL ASSETS (CONTINUING OPERATIONS)
December 31 (In billions) 2012 2011
U.S. $346.6 $336.6
Europe 192.8 212.5
Pacific Basin 56.4 62.3
Americas 33.6 46.7
Middle East and Africa 54.8 58.4
Total $684.2 $716.5

Total assets of global operations on a continuing basis were
$337.6 billion in 2012, a decrease of $42.3 billion, or 11%, from
2011. GECC global assets on a continuing basis of $277.6 billion at
the end of 2012 were 13% lower than at the end of 2011, reflecting
declines in Europe, primarily due to repayment of long-term
debt, decreases in the fair value of derivative instruments and
dispositions and portfolio run-off in various businesses at
Consumer. See GECC Selected European Exposures section.
Financial results of our global activities reported in U.S. dollars
are affected by currency exchange. We use a number of techniques
to manage the effects of currency exchange, including
selective borrowings in local currencies and selective hedging of
significant cross-currency transactions. Such principal currencies
are the pound sterling, the euro, the Japanese yen, the Canadian
dollar and the Australian dollar.

WORKING CAPITAL, representing GE current receivables and
inventories, less GE accounts payable and progress collections,
increased $1.0 billion at December 31, 2012, compared to
December 31, 2011 due to an increase in inventory and lower
progress collections, partially offset by decreased accounts receivable.
As Power & Water, Oil & Gas and Aviation deliver units out of their backlogs over the next few years, progress collections of
$10.9 billion at December 31, 2012, will be earned, which, along
with progress collections on new orders, will impact working
capital. We discuss current receivables and inventories, two important
elements of working capital, in the following paragraphs.
CURRENT RECEIVABLES for GE totaled to $10.9 billion at the end
of 2012 and $11.8 billion at the end of 2011, and included $7.9 billion
due from customers at the end of 2012 compared with
$9.0 billion at the end of 2011. GE current receivables turnover
was 8.8 in 2012, compared with 8.3 in 2011.
INVENTORIES for GE totaled to $15.3 billion at December 31, 2012,
up $1.6 billion from the end of 2011. This increase reflected higher
inventories across all industrial segments. GE inventory turnover
was 6.7 and 7.0 in 2012 and 2011, respectively.

All Your Questions About the Hyperloop, Answered

Popular Mechanics

It’s been four years since Elon Musk shared his vision for transcending ships, trains, cars, and planes. Will the hyperloop ever be more than a vision?

In August 2013, disappointed by the high-speed-rail system being built through the center of California, Elon Musk released a white paper called Hyperloop Alpha, describing a system of pod-cars shooting through vacuum tubes at nearly 800 mph. The paper ended with a plea for “the community” to work on an “open source transportation concept”—he was too busy, he said, to work on it himself. Here are the key questions that have arisen since.

Has anyone taken up Musk’s challenge to develop hyperloop technologies?

Yes—initially, two main companies, one called Hyperloop Technologies and another called Hyperloop Transportation Technologies (HTT). The former, now called Hyperloop One (H1), boasts a flashy venture-capitalist cofounder (Richard Branson, Virgin Airlines) and more than $150 million in funding. The latter has taken “open source” to heart and is more like a very well-organized consortium of engineers from around the world.

Was Hyperloop One cofounded by a guy legally named Brogan BamBrogan?

Yes. Although BamBrogan left and earlier this year formed his own company, Arrivo, one of a handful of other small startups working on the hyperloop. And a variety of academic teams are working on pod-car prototypes, spurred by a series of competitions hosted by Musk at SpaceX HQ.

So Musk isn’t totally leaving this up to “the community”?

No. SpaceX built a three-quarter-mile-long track, and has hosted two competitions (a third is scheduled for summer 2018), rewarding things like design, safety, and speed. At the second competition, the winning team hit 201 mph.

Are there other test tracks?

A Dutch company born from Musk’s first competition built a 30-meter-long test track in Europe. While the SpaceX track is only six feet in diameter, its track is full-size—it can handle tests with cars big enough to carry passengers. And H1 has the full-size DevLoop, a 500-meter test track outside Las Vegas. It hit 192 mph in a test in July.

It sounds like the technology is coming along.

It is. A team from NASA examined the feasibility of the hyperloop, purely from a technological standpoint, and found it doable. Everyone agrees the technology itself isn’t the challenge.

Then what’s the challenge?

There are two: cost and land acquisition. Musk’s original paper said hyperloop would be cheaper than existing high-speed-transit options, but at this point, with the technology still in development, there’s no consensus on the validity of his estimates. There is consensus on the second challenge: It’s incredibly difficult to acquire land on this scale in the U.S. For this reason, many companies are exploring projects in other countries. One of the more promising startups, TransPod, is based in Canada; H1 has a deal with the government of Dubai; and HTT with South Korea. It’s entirely possible we’ll see a working hyperloop abroad before we get one in the U.S.

At least we’ve got Musk. It’s too bad he’s staying so hands-off.

About that. In July, Musk tweeted he’d gotten “verbal govt approval” to build a hyperloop underneath the Atlantic seaboard with the help of his tunneling outfit, The Boring Company.

Why did he get back in?
The most interesting of many possible reasons: Creating a near-vacuum inside a tube is challenging and costly in Earth’s atmosphere, but on Mars atmosphere is negligible. The hyperloop could be the public transit system of Musk’s Red Planet colony.

In other words, we might see a working hyperloop on Mars before the U.S.?

Possible, but unlikely: SpaceX is currently planning its first, unmanned mission to Mars in 2020—probably a long shot—and that’s also about when most hyperloop startups are targeting for their first operable line.

Living on Mars? Who Will Collect the Garbage?

waste-management-world.com

Malcolm Bates wonders if it wouldn’t it be better for us to look after the planet we already have before we contemplate moving to Mars?

To be honest, I wasn’t really listening to my car radio at the time. After all, the news over recent weeks had been a depressing cocktail of tensions over North Korea, who the latest White House staffer is to have been fired (as if the rest of us really care!) and more recently, the tragic aftermath of both man-made (Like the Grenfell Tower fire in London, England) and natural disasters (From mudslides in South America, floods in Texas and hurricanes in th Caribean) that have befallen our Planet.

So was an item suggesting that in the future, mankind should up sticks and move to another planet designed to lift our spirits? It’s a well-trodden theme of science fiction of course, but from what I gather, this item was serious. It suggested Mars was the best option and…

“Hang on a minute” I shouted out loud while stuck in busy traffic. “Wouldn’t it be better if we looked after the planet we already have?”

Clearly, the worried-looking truck driver next to me couldn’t answer that question. But then seemingly, nor can anyone else in our political elite. For example, we cant even seem to agree on a common system to collect and utilise foodwaste – even though half the planet doesn’t get enough of it (food, that is), while the other half wastes it in Industrial portions.

Yet taking foodwaste – and moisture – out of the general waste stream is probably the most useful thing we can do in our industry. But ask three professionals for their idea of ‘Best Practice’ and, chances are, you’ll get four answers.

Come on – how hard can it be?

Here’s another waste-related issue that neither our politicians are seemingly still unable to solve. It’s now normal for motorists and truck drivers mostly, but children and teenagers as well, to eat and drink on the move.

The resulting debris gets thrown by the side of the road without thinking of what it costs to clear up. The answer? ‘Education’ has clearly failed. The threat of greater fines? Unlikely because detection is ineffective. So can ‘technology’ help here?

Instead of relying on manual labour, could a new breed of vacuum machine designed to collect roadside litter and fly-tipped material from verges help? And why cant someone design a truly effective foodwaste collection ‘system’ including the household bins? Sealed ‘vacuum pack’ modules perhaps?

My point? The waste industry is hardly rocket science is it? But call me old fashioned – I wouldn’t want to ride to another planet on a spacecraft built by a civilisation who couldn’t even master the problems of roadside debris or foodwaste here on earth, first. Would you?

Virgin Hyperloop One exclusive: Special interaction with Sr VP, Nick Earle

MoneyControl.com

US based ‘Virgin Hyperloop One’ which recently saw investment from Richard Branson is conducting a feasibility study to bring Hyperloop technology to Karnataka. Company’s Senior Vice President for Global Operations, Nick Earle told CNBC-TV18’s Rukmini Rao that the feasibility report which is expected within six weeks will reveal which route in Karnataka will see the most advanced mode of transport.

Watch video for more…

Amid Crisis, Toronto Transit Chief Is Named to Run New York Subway:

redlegagenda

On Tuesday, Andy Byford was named the president of New York City Transit, which oversees the buses and subways. CreditJ. Adam Huggins for The New York Times

With New York’s century-old subway system facing a crisis, transportation officials on Tuesday turned to a veteran transit leader, Andrew Byford, credited with turning around Toronto’s once beleaguered system to take over the city’s buses and subways.

Mr. Byford’s appointment as the president of New York City Transit comes on the heels of a series of changes in leadership at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which oversees the subway system, aimed at restoring accountability and changing a culture that for years has left the subway without adequate funding or support.

Even as the subway’s antiquated infrastructure, including its signal systems and tracks, was breaking down at an increasing rate, the money spent on maintenance has remained essentially the same, when adjusted for…

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Everything you need to know about getting around NYC over Thanksgiving

NY.Curbed.com

The holiday will bring myriad changes to New York’s streets, subways, buses, and more

Brace yourselves, New Yorkers: whether you’re sticking around town for the Thanksgiving holiday, or planning to get out of town for the weekend, your commute is going to be affected.

The myriad transit methods available in the city—subway, bus, commuter rail, you name it—will have schedule changes in effect beginning as early as this Wednesday, which is one of the busiest travel days of the year. (It’s also one of the city’s gridlock alert days, when traffic is expected to be at its worst.)

And it’s not just people leaving town for the holiday that you have to worry about: The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade will also affect transit service, as will the consumerist nightmare known as Black Friday.

But if you don’t have the option of staying in your apartment all weekend, we’ve got you covered: Here’s everything you need to know about service changes this week on subways, buses, airports, streets, and more.

NYC subway
On Thursday, expect the subway to operate on a Sunday schedule, meaning there will be less frequent service, and there will be changes to various lines (including the 2/3, which won’t run in Brooklyn).

The annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade will cause major drama on some subway stations on Thursday; according to the MTA, the 57th St station on the F line will be closed from 7 to 11 a.m., and some stations along the route—including heavily trafficked ones like 34th St-Herald Sq and 59th St-Columbus Circle will also have entrances and exits blocked off.

After the holiday, the subway reverts back to normal service—though “normal” is relative when it comes to the MTA, and there will be plenty of service changes taking you through the rest of the weekend.

And on a fun note: The New York Transit Museum’s special vintage holiday trains begin running again this weekend; they’ll travel between Second Ave and Lexington Ave-63rd St on the F line, and then along the Q—aka the Second Avenue subway—from 63rd St to 96th St. Trains begin running at 10 a.m. and the last one leaves the Upper East Side at 5 p.m

Both the Metro-North and Long Island Rail Road will be running extra trains on Wednesday to accommodate folks getting out of town for the holiday, and service changes will be in effect throughout the week. Here’s how that’ll look for each one:

Metro-North: There will be extra trains running on Wednesday beginning at 1 p.m., and additional trains into Manhattan on Thursday for parade-goers. On Thursday, trains will run on a “modified weekend” schedule, and on Friday, they’ll be operating on a Saturday schedule. Trains will run as they normally do on Saturday and Sunday.

On Wednesday evening, there will be 12 additional trains to Long Island from Penn Station, and six extra trains heading into Manhattan from various points. Ditto that on Thursday—to accommodate parade-goers, there will be extra trains running to and from Penn Station. More trains will be running on Saturday and Sunday as well, and that uptick in service will continue through the rest of the holiday season. Off-peak fares are in effect through the weekend.

New Jersey Transit
There are plenty of changes to NJT service over the weekend, chief among them the addition of early “getaway” service, similar to what the Metro-North is offering, on Wednesday; trains will begin running to and from Penn Station at 1 p.m. to accommodate holiday travelers. There will also be additional buses running on some lines from Port Authority beginning at 12:30 p.m.; best to check the NJT website for full details.

On Thursday, trains will operate on a weekend schedule, while bus service will vary by route. Friday will be modified regular service, with additional trains into NYC for Black Friday. Should you want to spend Black Friday at a mall in New Jersey (and if you do, why), there will be extra buses running to and from seven different shopping centers.