Fly the Red White & Blue on Veterans Day

PenneyVanderbilt

On November 11, we will be celebrating Veterans Day. Originally the day proclaimed to celebrate the end of WWI, and to honor those who served in that war, it is now the day, and rightfully so named as Veterans Day, to remember and honor ALL our veterans. To honor and remember all who have served in our Armed Forces, a day to honor and thank all who have served in the military, in wartime, and in peacetime.

While we can and should say “thank you” to a veteran, we should also display our American Flag, which represents our country that they fought for, in their honor While we may have different opinions regarding our military effort worldwide, we must not forget these service men and women that are fighting for, and dying for us, each and every day.

Second, fly our American Flag somewhere on your property. From your house…

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Fly the Red White & Blue on Veterans Day

On November 11, we will be celebrating Veterans Day. Originally the day proclaimed to celebrate the end of WWI, and to honor those who served in that war, it is now the day, and rightfully so named as Veterans Day, to remember and honor ALL our veterans. To honor and remember all who have served in our Armed Forces, a day to honor and thank all who have served in the military, in wartime, and in peacetime.

While we can and should say “thank you” to a veteran, we should also display our American Flag, which represents our country that they fought for, in their honor While we may have different opinions regarding our military effort worldwide, we must not forget these service men and women that are fighting for, and dying for us, each and every day.

Second, fly our American Flag somewhere on your property. From your house, your porch, flagpole, and any proper place where it might be seen. Fly it properly, but do fly it. Please show proper respect for our flag, wherever it is displayed, and Please show proper respect whenever our National Anthem is played at various functions. There is a proper way to show respect, and it would be nice not only to explain this to the younger people but also to show how to by example.

Lastly, ask your friends to do the same. Talk to them, Email them, and ask them to do the same. Your effort will make you feel good, and it won’t cost you anything.

As an aside, Congress has a week in November as “National Veterans Awareness Week”. This resolution calls for educational efforts for our school children concerning the contributions and sacrifices of our veterans. Our young people must be kept aware of the sacrifices that so many have made, and are still making for us.

Require Brightline to pay rail-crossing costs? You betcha!

TCPALM.COM

Some Florida lawmakers have set their sights, again, on regulating the Brightline passenger rail project.

Of course, the proposed Miami-to-Orlando rail line isn’t singled out by name in bills filed for the upcoming legislative session. But it’s clear, given the geographic proximity of the bills’ authors to the rail project, Brightline is foremost in their minds.

Brightline (formerly known as All Aboard Florida) is scheduled to begin passenger rail service between Miami and West Palm Beach by the end of the year, with full service to Orlando International Airport still several years away.

State Sen. Debbie Mayfield, R-Melbourne, has refiled a bill that sputtered and died during last spring’s legislative session. Among other things, Senate Bill 572 — also known as the “High Speed Passenger Rail Safety Act” — would give the Florida Department of Transportation authority to modify certain aspects of any passenger rail service in the state and impose penalties for violations.

It also would strengthen public-disclosure policies and give local governments a greater voice in decisions about installing fencing along rail corridors.

From the perspective of Treasure Coast residents opposed to Brightline, there is a lot to like about Mayfield’s bill. But its prospects for passage are virtually nil.

The Federal Railway Safety Act, passed by Congress in 1970, established the regulatory framework for freight and passenger railroads. With limited exceptions, federal law supersedes, or preempts, state and local efforts to regulate railroads.

Historically, rail companies have tended to prevail in court when challenging states’ attempts to regulate their operations.

NYC Subway Fare Hikes On Way If New Funds Not Found

PATCH.COM

Straphangers could pay more for subway rides if the MTA doesn’t get more money to get the trains back on track. The transit authority may have to hike fares absent new, consistent revenue to fund needed repairs to the deteriorating subway system, according to a report state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli released Thursday.

DiNapoli’s office estimates the MTA will be paying an extra $300 million annually — the equivalent of a 4 percent fare increase — for subway maintenance after it finishes phase one of Chairman Joe Lhota’s Subway Action Plan in 2018.

The MTA hiked fares on the subways and its suburban commuter railroads 4 percent this year. It’s planning similar hikes in 2019 and 2021. But that pace may need to accelerate to cover growing maintenance costs and the MTA’s long-term capital plan, DiNapoli’s report says.

“In the absence of adequate funding, the system could fall into further disrepair and riders could face unplanned fare hikes,” DiNapoli said in a statement. “The state and city need to find solutions to prevent these possibilities from becoming reality, and the MTA must make the best use of its resources.”

Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo disagree on how to bolster the MTA’s coffers. Cuomo supports a “congestion pricing” plan to impose tolls on cars crossing the city’s East River bridges, while de Blasio wants to raise income taxes on the richest New Yorkers.

But MTA officials “categorically reject the idea of any unplanned fare increases,” Lhota said in a statement. A de Blasio spokesman agreed that “asking straphangers to foot the bill is unacceptable.”

“Funding subway repairs will not come on the backs of riders and the comptroller is fear-mongering by injecting unplanned fare increases into the public discourse,” Lhota said.

Lhota said he’s “extremely encouraged” by rising public support for congestion pricing. But de Blasio’s spokesman, Austin Finan, said the mayor’s so-called millionaire’s tax proposal is the “only” solution.

“While the State continues to sit on its hands, the Mayor has put forth a plan backed by the majority of New Yorkers that calls on millionaires and billionaires to chip in a little extra,” Finan said in a statement.

The subway system needs major fixes to prevent the city’s transit crisis from worsening, DiNapoli’s report says. About a third of all subway trains are more than 30 years old. On average, a train travels 112,000 miles before breaking down — the shortest distance since 2001, according to the report.

The MTA’s yet-to-be-released 2020-2024 Capital Program will fund major upgrades, including the seccond phases of the Second Avenue Subway and Lhota’s Subway Action Plan. But it’s uncertain that the plan will get needed federal funding, and the state has yet to identify how it’s paying for its share, DiNapoli’s report says.

“Without additional assistance from its traditional funding partners,” such as the city and the state, “the MTA will have to raise fares and tolls faster than already planned to maintain, modernize and expand the system,” the report says.

The MTA has long planned to increase fares every other year as its costs continue to rise. But this year’s hike proved controversial. The MTA Board decided to raise Long Island Rail Road and Metro-North Railroad fares while keeping the subway fare at $2.75, though the cost of weekly and monthly unlimited MetroCards increased.

This summer, MTA Board members pushed back on the idea of continuing biennial fare increases, saying the agency should look for other revenue sources, The New York Times reported