Comments o Mark Tomlonson’s History of NY Central


July 21, 1958 The New York Central begins carrying mail between Chicago and Detroit in special “Flexi-Van” containers. The vans designated for mail are equipped with side doors. “Flexi-Van” service is expended to Boston and St. Louis.
Comment: Too little and too late.

July 22, 1920 William K. Vanderbilt dies. His son, Harold S. Vanderbilt inherits half of his father’s fortune and takes the family seat on the New York Central Board.
Comment: See the story on Robert Young taking over the NY Central from the Vanderbilts: https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/robert-r-young/

July 22, 1942 The United States begins compulsory civilian gasoline rationing due to World War II. The rationing will cause rail ridership, which has been in a steady decline since 1916, to markedly increase. This increase will cause many railroads to invest heavily in new passenger equipment after the war.
Comment: AGAIN, Too little and too late.

July 23, 1966 In a combination publicity stunt and test of how track functions under high speeds, a New York Central jet powered Rail Diesel Car hits 183.85 mph near Stryker, OH. Some of the data obtained from the test will be used in the design of the Metroliners.

July 20, 1906 The New York Central & Hudson River Railroad tests the first electric locomotives in New York City.
Comment: They were first tested just West of Schenectady in Scotia, NY

July 20, 1948 The Chicago Railroad Fair opens to celebrate the 100th Anniversary of Chicago railroads.
Comment: See full story on rail fair:
https://penneyandkc.wordpress.com/chicago-rail-fair/

July 17, 1938 The Wheeling & Lake Erie ends passenger service.

July 17, 1957 The New Haven and the New York Central test EMD’s FL-9 locomotive, capable of running from its own diesel prime movers or from a third rail.
Comment: New Haven liked them and bought; then they ended up on NY Central

July 17, 1957 The New York Central ends its “Travel Tailored Schedules”, returning to head-end equipment leading long, slow trains. Alfred J. Perlman has designed the new policy to drive away passengers and make train discontinuance easier.
Comment: Nobody likes “long, slow trains” especially express and mail shippers

July 15, 1979 The Kent-Barry-Eaton Connecting Railway starts operations between Grand Rapids and Vermontville on former Grand Valley/MC/NYC/PC/CR trackage. It is the first railroad in the U.S. operated by African-Americans.

July 12, 1903 The New York Central and the Rock Island open LaSalle Street Station in Chicago. The new station gives the New York Central an edge over rival Pennsylvania, still operating in an antiquated Union Station lacking in passenger amenities.
Comment: find out more on Chicago stations

July 7, 1853 The ten railroads linking Albany and Buffalo file papers with the Secretary of State of New York forming the New York Central. It becomes the largest railroad in the U.S. in terms of mileage, capitalization and net worth. (Some sources say May 17)
Comment: Read about Erastus Corning

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