Success Leaves Clues

Jeremy Mcgilvrey

success-leaves-clues

Let’s talk about success. I’m sure you know by now that successful people do – what unsuccessful people won’t do. That’s just a fact of life!

George Washington Carver said: “When you do the common things in life, in an uncommon way, you’ll command the attention of the world.” Pat Riley, one of the few coaches who’s won NBA titles as a player, and a coach put it another way. Riley said: “Do the ordinary things, extraordinarily well.”
Something I’ve learned is: Success will not lower its standards to us, we must raise our standards to success.
I’m sure you’re well aware of who Napoleon Hill is, the author of the highly influential book: Think and Grow Rich. Napoleon Hill spent his life studying, and observing the determinants of success. And in an interesting survey Hill conducted – he talked with people who had earned over 1 million dollars…

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Help for Poor United Airlines is On The Way

United Airlines monopolized the news today and yesterday. They literally threw passengers off their airplane to get their crews for Louisville on board. A PR, Facebook and media thing that made them look SICK.

Soon we have help for them. The Muhammad Ali Hyperlink will bring their people to Louisville in less time than their airplane will!!!!!!

Times Between Chicago and Louisville

HYPERLOOP Downtown Louisville to Gary International Airport

266 miles in 35 minutes

South Shore Line To Downtown

30 miles in 54 minutes

TOTAL 296 miles in 89 minutes

Flight Louisville to Downtown Chicago

Louisville Downtown to airport

10 miles in 15 minutes

Flight

287 miles 30 minutes

Airport to Downtown (CTA)

26 miles 72 minutes

TOTAL 323 miles in 117 minutes

AMTRAK No Service

Drive Louisville to Downtown Chicago

297 miles in 279 minutes

November 1944 (2)

Fantastic Story

Pacific Paratrooper

1 November –  Young Japanese girls wore headbands that designated them as Special Attack Force members. Daily they would recite the Imperial Precepts for Soldiers and Sailors before they began a twelve-hour shift in a makeshift factory in Kokura, Japan. Here they were producing 40 foot balloons to carry a bomb package across the ocean as they were released to drift on the Pacific jet stream.

A total of approximately 9,300 of these weapons were made and about 342 reached land, some as far east as Ontario, Michigan and Nebraska. Some were shot down or caused minor injuries and one hit a powerline of the nuclear weapons plant at Hanford, Washington. But – 5 May 1945 – near Klamath Falls, Oregon, a pregnant woman, Elyse Mitchell and five students were killed on their way to a picnic. These were the only casualties of the war in the 48 states.

2…

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The MTA says new stops on the Second Ave Subway are coming

Better bus service? A shorter L-train outage? New Second Avenue Subway stops??

The MTA says yes, you betcha, to all these projects and a few more. Today the MTA Board voted on a number of initiatives it says will improve service and boost turnaround time on major projects, including phase two of the Second Avenue Subway and L train tunnel repairs. The Board also voted to spiffy up train stations and add new buses citywide.

“Today’s votes will bring convenience and better service to the millions of New Yorkers who use our system every day,” said interim executive director Ronnie Hakim, in a prepared statement. “Improvements include modernized train stations in Astoria and a shorter closure of the Canarsie Tunnel, which will lessen the impact on L train riders as we undertake these necessary Sandy storm repairs.”

Phase two of the Second Avenue Subway, which now ends at 96th Street, will eventually bring Q trains zooming north to 125th Street. In the spirit of git-‘er-done, the Board voted to grant a $7.3 million contract for outreach services in advance of two new stations at 106th and 116th streets.

A partnership between Spectrum Personal Communications and transportation planners at Sam Schwartz Engineering will bring a community information center to East 125th Street this spring. At the center, English- and Spanish-speaking staff will be on hand to answer questions about the subway; lead educational events; and prepare plans for the Community Boards and elected officials. Be on the lookout for a project schedule once the (already underway) phase two preliminary design and engineering work wraps up.

Downtown, the MTA is pushing for L train tunnel work to be completed in 15 months, three fewer than initially projected. The $492 million project was awarded to Judlau Contracting and TC Electric, though Judlau is the same firm behind construction delays on the Second Ave subway.

Over in Queens, $150 million will go towards improving above-ground subway stations on the N and W line in Astoria. Improvements will add security cameras, art, better lighting, and countdown clocks, the commuter’s godsend. F0r a preview of what’s in store for the borough, look no further than the work being done on the first group of stations in this project, along 4th Avenue in Brooklyn.

Buses were not left out amid the many new things for trains. The city will get 60-foot articulated buses (53 in all) to replace the aging 40-footers in its fleet. These new buses will be suited up with, among other features, turn warnings for pedestrians, wifi, USB charging ports, and passenger counter.

The New Jim Crow & the Nightmare River

The Monster in Your Closet

When I started reading The New Jim Crow a couple of years ago, I felt my world rippling. I don’t mean this allegorically. I felt the smoothness disturbed by something else clawing to be let in.

Before I picked up the book, I’d been floating along on the smooth, clear water of U.S. life. I assumed all was (mostly) good and well straight down to the river’s bottom.

Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow‘s author, invited me to stop floating and actually dip a finger into the water. Beneath the thin veneer of calm, her recounting of recent American history informed me, I’d find turbulence and boiling water that was scalding people alive.

I dipped in one finger and discovered she was right. Horrified, I returned my hands to the surface. I set Alexander’s book aside and enjoyed my onward drift.

Over the summer, little burning bubbles began emerging from the water around…

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