New York Central In History: October 2016


September 29, 1929 The New York Central inaugurates the “Commodore Vanderbilt”, an all-first class, extra fare train. This gives the NYC nine trains running between New York and Chicago on a 20-hour schedule. The NYC has adopted the Pennsylvania Railroad strategy of a fleet of fast trains, rather than just one name train.

September 29, 1951 The New York Central’s Putnam Division is dieselized.

nycputnamdieselized
September 30, 1906 The New York Central & Hudson River Railroad holds its first public demonstrations of its third-rail electrification in New York City.
nycentralelectricnycity

September 30, 1923 The New York Central and the Michigan Central Railroads inaugurate the “Detroiter”, running between New York and Detroit.

October 1, 1836 The Erie & Kalamazoo Railroad begins official operation using horses for power. It is the first railroad in the former Northwest Territory but not the first west of the Alleghenies, as many sources report. The 40-mile trip between Port Lawrence [Toledo] and Adrian can take two days. Operation of the line will be irregular at first due to the rails sinking into bogs along the way.

October 1, 1848 The Michigan Central Railroad reaches Niles from the east.

October 1, 1927 In the Third Annual Inter-Company baseball Championship held at Cleveland OH, The Pennsylvania’s Terminal Division team defeats the New York Central’s Michigan Central team. While the game is going on, the two Presidents of the respective railroads play golf.September 30, 1923 The New York Central and the Michigan Central Railroads inaugurate the “Detroiter”, running between New York and Detroit.

October 1, 1836 The Erie & Kalamazoo Railroad begins official operation using horses for power. It is the first railroad in the former Northwest Territory but not the first west of the Alleghenies, as many sources report. The 40-mile trip between Port Lawrence [Toledo] and Adrian can take two days. Operation of the line will be irregular at first due to the rails sinking into bogs along the way.

October 1, 1848 The Michigan Central Railroad reaches Niles from the east.

October 1, 1927 In the Third Annual Inter-Company baseball Championship held at Cleveland OH, The Pennsylvania’s Terminal Division team defeats the New York Central’s Michigan Central team. While the game is going on, the two Presidents of the respective railroads play golf.

October 1, 1998 A saved and refurbished Grand Central Terminal is rededicated.

October 2, 1926 The second annual Pennsylvania Railroad-New York Central baseball game is held at Indianapolis. NYC’s Indiana Harbor Belt team wins, 3-1.

October 2, 1935 Two young men, aged 12 and 13 are taken off a boxcar roof on a Detroit bound freight train at the Augusta MI New York Central coal dock. In spite of carrying a single loaf of bread and no cash, they had hopes of seeing the Detroit Tigers play in the World Series.

October 2, 1947 Construction begins on the Toledo Central Union Terminal.
toledo-central-union-terminal

October 2, 1963 The ICC concludes its hearings on the Penn Central merger. The transcript runs to 20,000 pages and represents the longest railroad merger hearing to date.

October 7, 1871 The first Grand Central Depot opens in New York City at 42nd St. and Park Ave. for New York & Harlem Railroad trains, which vacate 27th Street Station. The building is patterned after St. Pancras Station (1865) in London. Its 12-track train shed (900′ x 275′) is billed as the “largest room in North America”. (Some sources say October 9)

grand-central-depot-vintage-1880-exterior

October 7, 1940 The New York Central takes delivery of its first class L-3 dual-service 4-8-2 “Mohawk” locomotive.

October 8, 1882 William H. Vanderbilt utters his famous “The public be damned!” quote. The rest of the quote is “I am working for my stockholders. If the public want the train, why don’t they pay for it?” (The train in question is a premium fare, deluxe weekly).

October 9, 1910 The first Michigan Central freight traffic moves through the Detroit-Windsor tunnel.

October 11, 1869 “Vanderbilt Bronze”, a large sculpted pediment celebrating Cornelius Vanderbilt’s career and featuring the larger than life statue now at Grand Central Terminal, is unveiled in a special ceremony at the St. John’s Park Freight Station in lower Manhattan.
vanderbiltstatuegctfrommetronorth

October 11, 1922 The Ft. Wayne Union Railway is incorporated to serve the International Harvester plant on the east side of Ft. Wayne. It is jointly owned by the Pennsylvania, Nickel Plate, New York Central and Wabash railroads, each with a 25% share in the new company.
October 12, 1950 The New York Central places an order for 200 diesel locomotives from four builders.

October 14, 1960 Senator John F. Kennedy begins a 14-hour whistle-stop tour through Michigan in Ann Arbor. He will tour the state aboard the private car of New York Central President Alfred Perlman.

October 15, 1860 The New York & Harlem Railroad begins through ticketing with the New York Central to Albany. The trip takes 4 hours, 18 minutes.

October 15, 1910 First Michigan Central passenger trains through the Detroit-Windsor Tunnel.

October 16, 1910 The Detroit River Tunnel Company, owned by the New York Central, routes all of its freight traffic via the new tunnel between Detroit and Windsor ONT, ending the car ferry on the Michigan Central – Canada Southern route.

October 16, 1916 The Michigan Central inaugurates the “Motor City Special”, an all First Class train running between Detroit and Chicago.

October 21, 1950 The Monongahela Railroad ends passenger service.

October 21, 2010 The Arian & Blissfield [MI] finalizes the purchase of an ex-Michigan Central Branch between Lansing and Jackson. It will be operated by an A&B subsidiary “Jackson & Lansing Railroad Company”, reporting marks JAIL.

October 23, 1928 The Pennsylvania Railroad forms the “Keystone Container Car Company” to operate its new LCL container service. The new company will compete with the New York Central’s “L.C.L. Corporation”. The first service by the Keystone Company will be one week from today between Philadelphia and New York.

October 25, 1848 The Galena & Chicago Union Railroad (later C&NW) runs the first steam locomotive out of Chicago. Named “Pioneer” it had worked for the Michigan Central as the “Alert”. Most of its duties on the MC were in the construction of the line west of Kalamazoo. The locomotive has been preserved.

October 25, 1958 New York Central passenger service between Bay City and Midland MI comes to an end.

October 25, 1959 The New York Central adds Budd Slumbercoaches (which it names “Sleepercoaches”) to the “20th Century Limited”. Coaches are removed, returning the “Century” to all-sleeping car status.

October 26, 1905 The New York Central & Hudson River Railroad places an order for 25,000 freight cars. This breaks the record set last week by the Pennsylvania Railroad’s order of 21,000 cars.

October 27, 1904 Informal tests are held at Schenectady of the new General Electric Locomotives bound for Grand Central Terminal.

October 27, 1956 The New York Central removes its Aerotrain from service.

October 27, 1957 The New York Central places its “Train X” set in commuter service between Chicago and Elkhart.

October 28, 1953 Train Telephone service begins on the “20th Century Limited” between Buffalo and Chicago.

October 28, 1956 After a 2-year study, the New York Central introduces its “Travel Tailored Schedule Plan”, an attempt to rationalize local and medium distance passenger service. The plan features short, fast trains with no head-end cars and few sleepers. Intermediate stops at smaller stations are curtailed.

October 29, 2004 Last scheduled run of 1962-vintage former New York Central ACMU cars on Metro-North.
acmu-1100-nyc-passenger-cars

October 30, 1850 The Michigan Central Railroad opens from New Buffalo to Michigan City IN using the charter rights of the New Albany & Salem Railroad (later CIL, L&N, CSX) within Indiana.

October 30, 1960 The “Commodore Vanderbilt” name disappears from New York Central passenger timetables.

October 31, 1903 The New York Central & Hudson River Railroad votes to electrify between Croton-on-Hudson on the Hudson Division and North White Plains on the Harlem Division. The system used will be a 660-volt DC on an under-running third rail. Later this fall they will sign a contract with General Electric for the locomotives.
October 31, 1957 The Canadian National Railway receives permission to operate the former New York Central Lines in the vicinity of Ottawa, Ontario. Some of the lines will be re-laid.

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