Hyperloop One’s co-founder and CTO Brogan BamBrogan is out at the company

Shervin Pishevar (l), Rob Lloyd and Brogan BamBrogan (r)
David Becker / Getty

Brogan BamBrogan, the co-founder and chief technology officer at Hyperloop One, has stepped back from his role at the company. The former Senior Vice President of Engineering Josh Giegel will be assuming BamBrogan’s role and has been promoted to co-founder and president of engineering and has joined the board, Recode has confirmed.

Hyperloop One is one of two companies competing to make Elon Musk’s dream of a high-speed mass transit system a reality. Sources say there has been internal tension brewing at the company among the executives and that it was the cause of many of the abruptly made executive changes. This comes at a time when the company is gaining momentum: On June 21, the company signed a deal with a Russian firm Summa group as well as the Russian government to construct a Hyperloop in Moscow. Just one month prior, Hyperloop One performed the first successful public test of its open-air propulsion system in Las Vegas.

The company made the title changes late this week just a few days after Afshin Pishevar, the chief legal officer and brother of chairman Shervin Pishevar, had been removed from his post. Afshin had been with the company since its inception. A source says Pishevar, along with his assistant general counsel David Pendergast, were out at the company as early as last week.

“Hyperloop One is pleased to announce that Josh Giegel has been promoted to President of Engineering and appointed to the Board of Directors. Josh has been a valued engineering leader as co-founder and SVP of Engineering since the company’s inception,” the company said in a statement. “Co-founder and CTO Brogan BamBrogan has decided to take a step back from Hyperloop One. We appreciate everything that he has done to put us on the path to creating the world’s first Hyperloop.”

This wouldn’t be the first instance of executive shuffling in the company’s short history. As the story goes, Hyperloop One — formerly Hyperloop Technologies — came out of a conversation Shervin Pishevar had with Musk. Pishevar, who recounted this story during an onstage interview with Jason Calacanis, said Musk mentioned the idea but said he was too busy with SpaceX. So in 2014, Pishevar took on the challenge of creating this new technology but specifically has his eye on transporting cargo. BamBrogan, an early member of SpaceX, later joined Pishevar and served as the interim CEO at the company until 2015 when Hyperloop One brought on ex-Cisco president Rob Lloyd to fill that role on a permanent basis.

But this apparent shake-up is much more sudden and far-reaching. Archived images of the company’s site show that as of June 16, Afshin Pishevar was still the chief legal counsel and Pendergast was also still in his role. Pendergast’s LinkedIn profile had also been updated as of early this week to include he was no longer at the company.

Today, the site had been changed to not only include Giegel’s promotion and former CTO BamBrogan departure — both of whom formerly worked at SpaceX — but also a promotion for Marvin Ammori. Ammori was hired by Afshin Pishevar as the assistant general counsel on June 8. Ammori is now listed as the general counsel.

In an article reporting Ammori’s hiring at Hyperloop, Afshin said the company was still looking to hire more attorneys and that Ammori would be in charge of collaborating with federal and local governments to help come up with regulations for this new type of transportation.

You can contact this reporter with more information at johana@recode.net or on Confide or Telegram at (516) 233-8877.

Just a Tiny Bit Magic

Sarky Tartlet

He thumps quickly into the bedroom, breathless and scared.

“Mom, I had a scary dream,” he says, voice shaky.

“Oh honey, I’m sorry.  What was your dream about?”

“There was a bad man with white eyes who made me go to jail,” he says, crawling up into my bed and into my arms.

“That sounds very scary.  But you’re safe.  No one is going to take you to jail. You’re safe,” I repeat.

He sighs, his body relaxes, but his heart still pounds.  We snuggle in the pre-dawn light. I can just hear the birds starting to sing.  After a quiet few moments I ask, “Are you ready to go back in your bed?”  He nods.

“Will you carry me?” he asks, voice low.  It is a rare request.

“Of course,” I say as I pick him up and he wraps his thin, strong, spidery limbs around me.

I place…

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The Lead Up to Two Thousand

Wide Awake But Dreaming

There are a few things going on today, some of which are personal and some that aren’t.  Let’s talk about those things that aren’t personal–  I began the revision on Chapter Four and managed my way through the first scene and about a third of the way through the second.  Given that the second scene is over thirty-eight hundred words, I likely edited and rewrote about two thousand words.

And rewrite I did:  sections of both were changed either a little or a lot.  The opening paragraph of the second scene is a good example, and this is where another character we know quite well by now is introduced for the first time.  So this is how that looked in the last draft:

(The following excerpts from The Foundation Chronicles, Book One: A For Advanced, copyright 2016 by Cassidy Frazee)

She’d started closing things down for the night when Coraline Gallagher received…

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Me and Bobbie McKee

Women: Each One A Survivor

sky-gate

For the last month or so, my DVR has been filling up a lot more than usual.  Dirty laundry has piled up until the weekends.  And my dog just sits and stares at me, trying to figure out what’s going on.  But the new laptop with the advanced keyboard that at first had me severely frustrated is now my new best friend.

Just as many of you have mentioned having yourselves, I’m going to have to force myself to come up with a designated sort of schedule for blogging and writing or nothing else is going to get done.  I feel a bit unbalanced, off-kilter with the many other things that have to be tended to.

But even though my scales are a bit tilted right now, there’s a wonderful blessing in all of this busyness – a blessing that feels like the bud on the Oriental Lily in my yard, bursting forth with a brilliance that’s breathtaking and oh so beautiful.

Let me…

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Ontario to extend GO Transit rail service to Niagara Falls

Starting in 2021, Ontario will bring new weekday GO Transit rail service between the future Confederation Station in Hamilton and the Niagara region. By 2023, the province will establish service to Niagara Falls.

Subject to a final agreement with CN, GO Transit parent agency Metrolinx will start the consultations, planning and design work required to implement the service.

To make way for the new service, Metrolinx will perform track improvements, provide new and upgraded rail stations, build a new layover facility in Niagara Falls, add new GO Transit rail units along the corridor and lay more than 18 miles of new track.

Three other stations are proposed along the corridor in addition to the Confederation Station and upgraded VIA Rail Canada Inc. stations in St. Catharines and Niagara Falls, according to a press release issued by Ontario’s Ministry of Transportation.

“This is a natural next step for Metrolinx, building upon comprehensive planning, service and infrastructure improvements we’ve been working on with our partners,” said Metrolinx President and Chief Executive Officer Bruce McCuaig in a press release. “Strengthening ties between Hamilton and Niagara Falls with weekday GO train service is helping us turn our vision of an integrated transit network into a reality.”

Expanding the regional rapid transit network also is aimed at supporting economic development, increasing travel options and managing congestion.

Work will begin in 2017 to plan, design and retrofit the existing VIA Rail stations, with completion expected in 2023.

CP to lay off 500 MOW workers

Canadian Pacific yesterday began laying off 500 track maintenance workers, the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference announced on its website.

The “temporary layoffs are the result of lower car volumes and a softening demand in a lackluster North American economy,” said CP Assistant Vice President of Public Affairs and Communications Martin Cej in a prepared statement to CBC News, which the union also posted on its website.

The layoffs follow CP’s announcement last month that it expects second-quarter revenue to decline about 12 percent compared with the same period in 2015. The Class I is anticipating lower volumes in bulk commodities, such as grain and potash. In addition, CP executives cited the Alberta wildfires and a strengthening Canadian dollar as reasons for the lower revenue.

However, the union has raised concerns that by laying off track maintenance workers, CP raised the risk of future derailments. Union officials denounced CP for neglecting to perform a formal risk assessment of how the job cuts would impact rail lines across Canada.

In his statement to CBC, Cej said that CP has invested heavily in track infrastructure over the past decade and that the layoffs were temporary until market conditions improve.

The layoffs will not affect CP’s commitment to safety, as the railroad will continue to perform visual inspections and ultrasonic rail flaw detection of track, Cej said.

“CP carefully considered the changes that were being made and concluded that since they posed no additional risk to employees, the public, property or the environment, a risk assessment was not required,” said Cej. “Transport Canada was notified and agreed with this conclusion.”

New Yorkers can start using a secret subway tunnel under Central Park this December

Sitting below one of the most famous parks in the world is a half-mile train tunnel built by the city of New York forty years ago that you won’t find on any subway map. Sometimes it’s there, and sometimes, it’s not.

This tunnel has sat below Central Park, barely used, for decades. Thanks to the first major piece of work done to New York’s subway system since the 1980s (paywall), commuters will soon be able to ride in this previously hidden subway structure.

The tunnel, which runs between the 57th Street and 7th Avenue, and Lexington Avenue and 63rd Street in Manhattan, has never had a
dedicated train line running through it. If you’re heading northbound on an N, Q, or R train from 57th Street, for a second, you’ll get a glimpse of it, but according to archivists for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), New York’s governing body of public transit, it’s only appeared on subway maps for two brief periods in 1995 and 1998.

The tunnel was built in the early 1970s, as part of a connection between Manhattan and Queens along 63rd Street. The extra loop of tunnel was originally part of a project to create a new subway line along Second Avenue, but this plan was abandoned when a recession hit the city in the 1970s. All these years later, the city is finally getting around to completing that Second Avenue line.

Mike Murphy

Army Love : The strongest kind of love

GirlandWorld

 Army Wife ? Army Girlfriend?Army Love? What is so special about it? Why so much hype around this word ‘Army Love’? Well nobody heard Politician love, IAS love, IPS love neither there is a term to define women who have married or in love with a banker, farmer, minister or etc. But then how come women in love with soldiers are distinctly categorised? Don’t you think It would be tough to be a kind of woman who constantly loves a man whose job is to protect the country and whose distraction may costs lives or sometimes freedom of the country? Don’t you think such women who  in spite of crying out loud every night of separation for months yet have courage to say to their soldier ” Hey, I am fine. Kids are fine. Absolutely everything smooth and fun. You just keep yourself safe and focussed and come back soon.”…

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