Winter storm threatens Cape Cod with up to 18 inches of snow

The second winter storm in four days to hit the Northeast centered on New England on Monday, bringing howling winds and coastal flooding and threatening Cape Cod and southeastern Massachusetts with up to 18 inches of snow.

The storm could last into Tuesday, when New Hampshire’s first-in-the nation presidential primary is held. The storm was accompanied by high winds that brought scattered power failures, as well as coastal flooding from south of Boston to Cape Cod and Connecticut. A major surface road in south Boston was closed by flooding late Monday morning.

By Monday afternoon, Cape Cod and the islands appeared to have met the conditions for a blizzard, the National Weather Service said. Much of the rest of Massachusetts and most of Connecticut were under a winter storm warning and could get as much as 10 inches of snow. Boston could see 6 to 10 inches.

The storm led to accidents, including in Connecticut, where a charter bus crashed and fell on its side on Interstate 95 in Madison. At least 30 people were injured, including six of them critically.

In Rhode Island, crowds of mourners lined the streets amid bitter temperatures and falling snow to bid farewell to former Providence Mayor Buddy Cianci, whose hearse was carried by horse-drawn carriage from City Hall to the city’s Roman Catholic cathedral.

Other parts of the Northeast, including Northern New England and the New York City area, was expected to get much less snow. New York City, Philadelphia and northern New Jersey could get 2 to 3 inches from Monday into Tuesday night, the weather service said.

The snow meant unpleasant outdoor work for some people.

Sean Nardone, a custodian for the U.S. Postal Service, was scheduled to spend the day shoveling and treating the front steps of several post offices south of Boston.

“I don’t like it very much,” Nardone said as he tossed rock salt on the steps of the Whitman post office while a howling wind blew.

“I hope global warming friggin’ helps out this winter,” he said. “I hate to sound selfish, but I could use some warmth.”

Raj Patel, who co-owns a convenience store in Whitman, said the storm is good for business.

“It’s convenient for the neighborhood. We are always open for them. In past storms, we’ve sold out of milk right away. Milk, bread, water — a lot of people walk from their homes, so we stay open,” he said.

Communities across the region closed schools and issued on-street parking bans.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker closed state offices in nine counties Monday, and state courts were closed in 10 counties.

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, which was crippled by a series of historic storms during Boston’s record-breaking winter last year, was operating on a normal weekday schedule with winter routes in effect for buses. Although there were delays, no major problems were reported.

Restoring confidence in the MBTA’s reliability is important, state Transportation Secretary Stephanie Pollack said.

“That’s what we all lost faith in last winter,” she said. “I think every storm where the T is able to run service pretty well, I hope, will help to restore that (faith).”

Boston’s Logan Airport remained open, but hundreds of inbound and outbound flights were canceled.

Ferry service to Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard was suspended.

Port of Jeffersonville broke shipping records in 2015

Port of Indiana-Jeffersonville set an annual record with total tonnage for 2015, exceeding the previous year’s volume by nearly 16 percent, port officials said in a press release. The port handled 2.8 million tons of cargo last year, which were driven by heavy volumes of agriculture and steel products.

Shipments of steel in 2015 more than doubled the previous record set in 2014, helped in part by rising demand in the U.S. auto industry. Grain volume was the second highest in port history, following the record harvest year of 2014.

For the year, the port handled 1,300 barges, 17,000 rail cars and 180,000 trucks.

Additional highlights for Jeffersonville port included the award of a $10 million Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation, which will help fund a $17 million intermodal project. In additional, the port broke ground on a $30 million transportation corridor that will link the port to the River Ridge Commerce Center’s industrial park.

The projects will expand the port’s rail and bulk-loading capacity, said Port Director Scott Stewart.

“Both our port and our region are experiencing an infrastructure bonanza,” said Stewart. “These projects will greatly improve the region’s strength in advanced manufacturing and logistics.”

Miami-Dade exploring rail link to the American Dream mega-mall

Miami-Dade officials have begun talks with a company tied to the All Aboard Florida railway about expanding a different set of tracks to the site of a massive mall theme park planned near Miami Lakes.

The preliminary talks involve cargo tracks serving rock-mining quarries in western Miami-Dade being extended north along Florida’s Turnpike until they get close enough to serve American Dream Miami, the 200-acre entertainment and shopping complex that would be the largest mall in the United States. The existing cargo rail already connects to other rail lines that link up near Miami International Airport, a hub where both Metrorail and Tri-Rail run trains throughout the region.

Classic Christmas Song Gives A Little Extra to St. Lawrence University

“I’ll Be Home for Christmas” remains one of the most beloved Christmas songs of all times, and it gives more to St. Lawrence University than just a special holiday feeling.

Written by J. Kimball “Kim” Gannon, a 1924 graduate of St. Lawrence, along with Walter Kent and Buck Ram, the song was popularized by Bing Crosby in 1943 and became a top-10 hit. Recorded by Decca Records, the song touched a tender place in the hearts of Americans while it was embroiled in World War II, and it earned Crosby his fifth gold record. Because of its personal yet widely appealing lyrics, “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” has lasted well beyond the tumultuous period of war and separation.

Since its debut, more than 250 artists and groups have recorded “I’ll Be Home for Christmas,” including Perry Como, Frank Sinatra, Andy Williams, Tony Bennett, Ann Murray, and Michael Bublé. Last year, the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) named “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” the 10th most-performed holiday song of the century.

Born in Brooklyn in 1900, Gannon went on to write a number of popular songs during the swing era. He also penned St. Lawrence’s alma mater, “Alma Mater.” Campus lore has it that he wrote in the fall of his senior year on his landlady’s piano.

Gannon went on to a successful career as a lyricist, with some 200 popular songs to his name and three Academy Award nominations. Some of his more popular tunes include big-band standards “Moonlight Cocktail,” recorded in 1942 by Glenn Miller; “A Dreamer’s Holiday,” recorded in 1949 by Perry Como; and “I Understand,” recorded at different times by Nat King Cole, Dave Brubeck and Jimmy Dorsey.

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